LEARNMATE: Keeping You Safe While You Learn

LEARNMATE: Keeping You Safe While You Learn


As much of Australia is learning to live with the presence of COVID-19, many Melbourne suburbs will return to Stage 3 lockdown restrictions due to the rising number of cases infiltrating the State.

Fortunately for those LearnMate students and tutors who do live in areas affected by the lockdowns, we have processes in place to allow for lessons to continue seamlessly. If you need to transition to online lessons, click here if you would like to find online tutors. The same process is available to anyone looking for a tutor but is also residing in a restricted Melbourne suburb.

For all our other students and tutors who live outside of these areas, you have the option of in-person or online tutoring. The choice is yours. If you do prefer to have an in-person session, you can rest assured that all of our tutors will work safely with you to help keep you both fit and healthy.

For more information about how LearnMate is working to keep you educated and safe click on the link.

LEARNMATE: Keeping You Safe While You Learn
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Exam Date and Essay Structures

Exam Date and Essay Structures

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hello everyone, here is my article for July, which will discuss structuring your essays. Essays are the most common way that Unit 4 is assessed, and section C of your exam is also an essay, which is worth 40% of your mark for the exam (30 marks out of 75).

Before discussing essays, I would like to quickly alert you to the fact that the VCAA have released the exam timetable for this year, and the English Language exam is on Thursday November 12, at 2:00pm. This is just two days after the core English exam, so it is very early in the exam period. The exam timetable can be found here: https://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/administration/Key-dates/Pages/VCE-exam-timetable.aspx

With that out of the way, I will now move onto discussing how to structure essays. Many English Language students do not enjoy writing essays, especially when they commence the subject. Essays do not entail responding to a text and basing your entire response on a text provided (unlike sections A and B), although that does not mean you can roll out a pre-prepared essay, regardless of the prompts. Assessors can pick a pre-written essay from a mile away, and an essay that does not answer the question is the fastest route to receiving zero for section C, short of leaving it blank. Furthermore, another thing that makes essays different from the other two sections on the exam is the fact that they have a defined structure, of an introduction, body paragraphs, and finally a conclusion. These paragraphs will be the subject of the rest of the article.

Introductions:

The introduction is extremely important to your essay, as it is the first thing that the examiner will read. Furthermore, most examiners say that they can tell a student’s mark (within one or two marks) based on the introduction, and a good introduction will put the assessor in a more positive frame of mind about your work, thus making them more likely to find the positive elements in your essay (therefore finding more marks for you).

There are different ways that people write introductions, although the general structure that I prefer to use is 1-2 sentences introducing the topic and your stance on it (how much you use depends on the topic and how much explanation of the prompt is needed), a sentence on what each body paragraph will be, and finally a sentence tying up your introduction and linking it back to the essay prompt.

Additionally, your introduction should be just that, an introduction. It is not a place to put substantive explanations or examples, it should be introducing what you will be writing about and your stance on it.

Body paragraphs (usually you would write around 3):

Even though assessors usually have a very strong idea of your mark after reading your introduction, most of the marks lie in the body of the essay, which is where you will discuss the substantive material of your essay.

These paragraphs probably have the most defined structure, as you are expected to follow the TEEL structure (Topic sentence, Evidence & Explanation, Link back to topic).

The topic sentence needs to be fairly short and should introduce what the paragraph will talk about, in relation to the prompt, and the link sentence should link the paragraph back to the prompt. Neither of these should contain the substance of your argument.

Your evidence and explanations are where your substantive arguments lie. Your evidence and explanation will probably look something like:

  • Point
  • Example(s)
  • How example(s) prove the point

Most likely, you will have 2-4 of these in each body paragraph. You need real world examples in your essays (I have discussed the importance of examples in multiple previous articles), and you must also reference at least one of the stimuli provided alongside the prompt, at some point throughout your essay.

Conclusion:

In English Language, the conclusion is very short. The conclusion is probably only 2-3 sentences, restating your contention and the points you have made. Further, assessors like seeing a bit of, “food for thought,” in your final sentence, be it a quote or a statement that is something to think about beyond the essay. Conversely, assessors do not like seeing phrases such as, “in conclusion,” when commencing your conclusion, so avoid them.

Despite being short, having a conclusion is important for your essay, as not having one means that the essay is incomplete, and you will lose marks for a well structured essay.

Anyway, I hope that this article proves helpful and I will have another one for you in August.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: An Overview of Formal Language, Topic and Floor Management in Conversations and An Overview of Face Needs and Prestige.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Exam Date and Essay Structures
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The Benefits and Importance of Learning About Grammar

How to Study in Times of Stress

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


For many students in Australian schools, grammar is something that an early primary school teacher touched on, and then never returned to. You might remember that verbs are doing words, adjectives are describing words and nouns are things, places and names. But beyond that? Most students are largely unaware of grammar, and instead prefer to use language intuitively. This is normal when English is your first language. You can get through life without knowing much about grammar, but it can be a great advantage to have a better understanding than others.

Why is learning about grammar relevant to you?

      1. Having a better grasp of English grammar will help you to communicate better. Understanding grammar terms will give you the confidence to write strong, convincing prose. Here are some examples of areas which, if worked upon, can dramatically improve your communication skills:
        • Consistency of tenses
        • Subject-verb agreement
        • Avoid run-on sentences and sentence fragments
        • Correct use of commas
        • Correct use of apostrophes
        • Avoid misplaced modifiers
        • Know the words you commonly confuse (e.g. effect vs affect)
      2. Get better grades in school. In school, everyone has to take English as a subject, and correct grammar is a key component of fluent, effective writing. Knowing the difference between ‘effect’ and ‘affect’ might seem like a small thing, but little things like this all add up – poor use of grammar will drag your grades down.
        By the way, ‘effect’ is generally used as a ‘noun’, and ‘affect’ is generally used as a verb. Let’s look at this in practice: ‘What are the effects of this medication? The last medication affected me a lot.’
      3. Knowing the rules empowers you to be a better writer. There are a bunch of grammar myths, and if you don’t know what they are, you might unnecessarily limit your writing. For instance, many people believe ending a sentence with a preposition is ungrammatical, but this simply isn’t true! In fact, the very first sentence of this article ends with a preposition. Another area of controversy is split infinitives, which means placing an adverb between ‘to’ and a verb: for example, ‘to casually walk’. Grammar dinosaurs will argue that split infinitives are just incorrect, but this is simply a myth – many skilled writers employ split infinitives.
      4. Good grammar is essential after you finish school. When it comes to applying for jobs in certain industries, poor grammar is an instant red flag for employers. It’s important you are able to communicate in grammatically correct English to convey professionalism and credibility. This is a skill which continues to be relevant when you enter the workplace.
      5. It will help if you ever want to learn another language. If you have ever started learning another language, many of the grammatical terms can be confusing, to say the least. What’s a past participle? Who knows how to use the pluperfect tense? What does a gerund have to do with my life? If you already know what these terms represent in English, it will make the learning experience much easier.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Strategies to Build Self-Confidence in Students,  Top Tips for Scholarship Exam Preparation and Benefits of Meditation for Students.

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

The Benefits and Importance of Learning About Grammar
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Homeschooling vs School: What’s Better?

Homeschooling vs School: What’s Better?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


Across Australia, parents are given the option of enrolling their children in a school or in homeschooling education. While most children go to school, parents who choose to homeschool their children must get permission from the relevant authority in their area and make sure the learning is aligned to the national curriculum.

According to this 2019 article on homeschooling, around 20,000 children in Australia participate in homeschooling, which is a number that has risen significantly since 2013.

Let’s look at some of the main reasons that parents might choose to homeschool their children:

  • Religion. Some parents with religious beliefs might prefer homeschooling, particularly if there are no schools which match their religion close to them, or if religious school fees are too expensive for their budget.
  • Location. For families that live in regional or rural areas, or far away from most schools, homeschooling can represent simply the most practical option.
  • Specific educational needs incompatible with traditional schools. Some children struggle more than others with traditional schools, whether it be from special educational needs, bullying or simply not fitting in. Increasingly, families with these children are choosing to withdraw from school and enrol in homeschooling, instead of facing the stress of moving from school to school multiple times to find the right fit.
  • Parenting philosophy. Some parents are ideologically opposed to the teaching methods used at schools and prefer to take over their children’s education themselves.
  • Educational outcomes might be better. Research on this topic is limited in Australia mainly to NAPLAN results – homeschooled children are shown to overall score higher on NAPLAN. Perhaps the one-to-one level of attention not available in schools helps children flourish. However, it’s worth noting that NAPLAN is not necessarily a measure of success!

What are some of the benefits offered by traditional schools?

  • Socialisation. The most common reason many parents are hesitant to take up homeschooling is that it might limit opportunities for their children to form social bonds with others, an essential part of setting them up for life with social skills.
  • Structure. The school day is inherently structured and regimented, which suits some learners more than others. Many students benefit from having a strong sense of routine, and it helps them to learn better.
  • More subject options. If a parent is their child’s only teacher, it is likely the child misses out on the opportunity to learn about some areas, such as art, music and sports.
  • Teachers with pedagogical training. Teachers in schools must have a teaching qualification, which means they should be experts in learning – your child could have a great learning experience with a variety of teachers.
  • Independence. From school, students begin to learn how to take care of themselves outside of the home. School is a great way of introducing different responsibilities to children as they begin to learn more about the world.

There are pros and cons to homeschooling as compared to a more traditional education. There is no one-size-fits-all recommendation when it comes to weighing up homeschooling and traditional schooling – everything depends upon the needs of the child and parents.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How to Develop Problem-Solving Skills in StudentsBenefits of Using Technology in the Classroom and How to Study in Times of Stress.

 – LearnMate Tutoring.

Need an In-Person or Online Tutor? Search for a Tutor Here Today!


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Homeschooling vs School: What’s Better?
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LearnMate’s Dmitri Dalla-Riva Winner of the EO Accelerator Of The Year 2020

LearnMate’s Dmitri Dalla-Riva Winner of the EO Accelerator Of The Year 2020


Earlier this month, LearnMate owner, Dmitri Dalla-Riva, was awarded the prestigious Entrepreneurs’ Organization Accelerator of the Year Award. The recipient of this award successfully shows outstanding business growth as well as significant entrepreneurial and leadership development while contributing back to the EO Accelerator program.

The Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is a global business network of more than 10,000 leading entrepreneurs in more than 142 chapters and 46 countries. EO provides an opportunity for business owners to come together to learn from others who have also faced similar opportunities and challenges to develop on both a professional and personal level.

“Being a part of the EO Accelerator Program has been such a positive step as I work to build LearnMate. Meeting with fellow entrepreneurs has provided me with a wealth of information that has helped me to grow my business. It is a privilege to be a part of this support network in Melbourne.” Dmitri Dalla-Riva, Owner, LearnMate.

LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering in-person and online lessons in primary & high school subjects. For more information, contact email Emma Paull at LearnMate.

Need an In-Person or Online Tutor? Search for a Tutor Here Today!


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

LearnMate’s Dmitri Dalla-Riva Winner of the EO Accelerator Of The Year 2020
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