The Benefits of Learning a Foreign Language

The Benefits of Learning a Foreign Language

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


Does your school offer Chinese or Italian? French or Japanese? Indonesian or Spanish? These are often perceived by students as the most difficult subjects to choose, and therefore are avoided. Others might think that these are subjects which will not be applicable to their lives. However, there are so many benefits reaped from learning a foreign language. Additionally, during school is probably the best time to begin learning, as you will have years in which you can build upon your knowledge gradually. Let’s look into just a few of the reasons that you should pick up that language subject.

Improved memory: learning languages involves a large amount of memory work, often put to use while trying to learn new vocabulary or grammar rules. If you look at memory like a muscle, the consistent mental exercise involved in learning a language can only help you develop and strengthen your memory in other areas of your life. Communicating in different languages is about understanding patterns, much of the time, and this, too will help you develop better problem-solving and critical thinking skills. In fact, it has been shown in some studies that learning languages other than English generally improves your abilities across other subjects, too.

Strengthened self-confidence: language learning always involves trying and failing; in fact, this is the only way to improve. Learning to fail and still persist, drawing upon deep self-confidence, is a great life skill which is developed strongly through language learning.

Better cultural awareness: lose your perception of English as the only language and learn about cultural differences, which will combine to help you develop sensitivity and greater awareness. In an ever more globalised world, these are skills which will help you consistently in the workforce and throughout your lifetime. This will also shed light on your own culture, as you begin to consider it in a global context.

Improved understanding of English: this might seem counterintuitive. However, learning about grammar and parts of language in other languages will actually help you to better understand English in a variety of areas including grammar, vocabulary, conjugation and sentence structure. This might allow you to use your first language more creatively!

Have more rewarding experiences while travelling: imagine what you can do in a foreign country if you could speak the language! A whole new world will open up to you in countries around the world if you are able to communicate with the locals, allowing experiences beyond crowded tourist attractions. Even if you’re unable to communicate fluently, you will often find that locals will really appreciate any kind of effort you make.

Give yourself an employment edge: to potential employers, someone who has learnt a foreign language might have an edge over someone who is monolingual. The ability to communicate in other languages will give you opportunities to network that others may not be able to access. If nothing else convinces you, mastery of a foreign language is seen as highly useful and could boost your resume, opening up more opportunities to various career choices in the future!

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 3 Facts You Should Know About Your ATAR, Tips for Supporting Your Child in Year 11 and 12! and Will anyone care about your ATAR in a year?

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

The Benefits of Learning a Foreign Language
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Transitioning in to Units 3 and 4

Transitioning in to Units 3 and 4

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hi everyone, here is my article for November. This article is primarily aimed at year 11 students who are doing English Language next year, as this year’s year 12 cohort have recently completed their exam and have no need to read my articles again (which is no doubt a source of joy for all of them). This article will provide you with an overview of English Language and will discuss how to use units 1 and 2 to prepare for units 3 and 4.

However, before going into English Language, I would just quickly like to congratulate this year’s year 12 cohort on completing their English Language exam. Good luck for the rest of your exams, and I hope you get the results that you are hoping for, but please remember that it is not the end of the world if you do not. Now stop reading this article and go back to studying for your remaining exams or celebrating the fact that you have finished your formal schooling (depending on your exam timetable and when you read this).

For students planning on studying units 3 and 4 of English Language in 2020, here is an overview of the course.

Unit 3 covers the nature and function of informal (AOS 1) and formal (AOS 2) language, whereas Unit 4 covers language variation and identity, by looking primarily at national identity and Australian English in AOS 1, and individual and group identity in AOS 2. What you discuss in unit 3 is relevant and important for unit 4, so it is worth continually revising throughout the year to ensure that you stay on top of the course (doing this will also help your exam preparation, so there is nothing to lose, and plenty to gain from doing some continual revision throughout the year).

In terms of knowledge that rolls over from year 11 to year 12, most of what you do in year 11 in terms of skills (such as essay writing and answering short answer questions) does transfer over to year 12 (obviously what you have done at school skills wise will impact how transferable it is).

However, not all of the content is transferable, especially from unit 2. The history of the English Language and the historical factors influencing the evolution of the English language are not relevant to units 3 and 4 (please still do revise it for the purpose of your unit 2 exams though, they are important). However, some of the unit 2 content is relevant, such as the processes by which language changes (commonisation, blends, etc.) and what you have learned about Aboriginal English (Aboriginal English is especially important to unit 4 AOS 1).

Moreover, a vast majority of what you did in unit 1 is relevant and is in fact essential knowledge for units 3 and 4. The most important thing from unit 1 is the metalanguage that you learned. Your discussion of written and spoken language in unit 1 will be especially helpful when it comes to doing short answer sections and analytical commentaries (sections A and B of the exam). However, child language acquisition, is not relevant to units 3 and 4.

Overall, it is really worth keeping your unit 1 and 2 notes, as they may provide you with additional information that your teacher assumes you remember from year 11. In fact, your year 11 notes are most likely to be an exceptionally useful resource. I still use them tutoring, and I used them frequently in year 12.

Anyway, good luck for your Unit 2 exams (please do not neglect content that is not relevant to units 3 and 4), and in your preparation for year 12. I will have another article for you next month.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Discussion and Examples of Language Varying to Reflect Identity, Comparing Australian English to American and British Englishes and An Introduction to Unit 4 Area of Study 1


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Transitioning in to Units 3 and 4
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Guide on the Best Way to Learn a Language

Guide on the Best Way to Learn a Language

This article has been written by Celine Badaoui, an HSC Biology & Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Celine then please check out her page here.


Learning a new language can be loads of fun! Not to mention the range of proven benefits individuals can acquire in the process. This includes improved memory, increased attention span, better cognitive abilities and better decision-making skills just to name a few. Below is a guide of the most important steps students should follow when learning a new language.

  1. Setting Goals

When undertaking any new task, setting goals is a great way to start in order to provide direction and motivation to work hard, and this can definitely be applied to learning a new language. These goals should follow the SMART principle. Firstly, they should be specific, so that the individual is clear on exactly what they want to achieve. They should also be measurable, for example a student can aim to learn 20 new words a week, in order to help them see how well they are progressing. Next, goals should be achievable and realistic, as students shouldn’t set themselves up for failure, for example wanting to become fluent in a new language in one week! Finally, goals should be time specific, as setting certain time periods on short and long-term goals will enhance a student’s motivation to complete them.

  1. Language Learning Techniques

There is a vast range of study techniques that can be applied in the language learning process. Firstly, students should make it a point to learn the most important words first. Whilst the English language has over 1 million words, the top 100 make up 90% of English texts! So, don’t waste time and make sure you get those key words down packed.

Flash cards are a great tool for language learning as this can help with the visualization and memorization of key words. Flash cards are also great to get someone to quiz you with and put your language skills to the test.

There are a range of apps available to assist students learning a new language in a fun and interactive way. Some of these include Babbel, Duolingo and HelloTalk, which are all great for practicing your language skills through games, quizzes and tutorials.

Teaching is often described as one of the best strategies to accelerate learning, as explaining things out loud can help students consolidate their own understanding. That is why teaching friends and family about the language that you’ve learnt will assist with memorization and fluency.

Finally, when learning a new language, studying the culture is another great strategy to help with the learning process, as it is helpful to understand the history of the words being spoken. This is because knowing more about a country’s beliefs and customs can assist with gaining a better understanding as to why certain cultures say and do things in certain ways.

  1. Integrate the Language into Everyday Life

Once a student has reached a stage where they are more confident with their language skills, the best practice they can gain is through integrating the language into their every day activities. Examples of this can include watching foreign films, seeking out a friend who speaks the same language to converse with, or even joining a language club. These final steps in the language learning process will help students in refining their skills, helping with better pronunciation and fluency.

To get in contact with HSC tutors and other tutors in Sydney from LearnMate, please learn more here.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 5 Ways to Best Prepare for the HSC!,The Best Way to Reduce Stress in Year 12: It’s Not What You Think and Study Tips for HSC English This Year!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Guide on the Best Way to Learn a Language
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Brain Foods to Help You Study for Your Exams

Brain Foods to Help You Study for Your Exams

This article has been written by Celine Badaoui, an HSC Biology & Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Celine then please check out her page here.


Sustaining a healthy diet during exam periods is critical in order to ensure students have optimal brain functioning. This includes eating well-balanced, regulated meals, however there are also a range of specific foods that are particularly good to help students with their study due to the nutritional composition and characteristics they possess.

Fruit and Vegetables

For students in need of a snack with a natural sugar boost to increase their motivation and extend their time spent study, fruits and vegetables are the best source to go to. Fruits and vegetables that are rich in antioxidants are particularly good for this, such as blueberries and grapes. Antioxidants improve the communication between brain cells as it increases the brain’s capacity to form new connections, in turn improving memory and learning.

Salmon

Salmon and other oily fish are great sources of omega-3 and protein, which is important to allow for optimal brain functioning. This is because consuming omega-3 results in increased blood flow around the brain, in turn leading to improved thinking ability and cognitive skills.

Eggs

Eating eggs for breakfast is a great way for students to get an energy boost when starting their day. Eggs contain several important vitamins and nutrients and are particularly high in protein. As well as this, they contain less than 100 calories, hence they are a healthy option for students, providing them with the extra energy they need to study.

Avocados

Avocados are a source of monosaturated fats. The consumption of these fats has been linked to the reduction of high blood pressure, a condition commonly associated with cognitive decline. Hence, eating avocados is a great way to lower a student’s risk of declining cognitive health in the future as they further their studies.

Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate is a great snack for students to treat themselves with and has the added health benefit of being high in antioxidants. This is highly beneficial to students as the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress which leads to cognitive decline and these antioxidants help to prevent this, which is crucial for improving a student’s ability to learn.

Yoghurt

Yoghurt is a great brain food that is packed with probiotics, the bacteria that help to maintain a healthy and happy gut! These probiotics also health with managing stress, anxiety and depression, as well as boosting the brain’s capacity to learn. In addition to this, yoghurt is a great medium to add other brain-foods in, such as fruit and nuts.

Olive Oil

Olive oil is one of the main ingredients included in the Mediterranean diet, a diet associated with a range of health benefits for overall well-being, such as lowering the risk of dementia onset. Research has also shown that olive oil is specifically associated with protecting the brain against cognitive decline, therefore it is a great option for students to use when cooking meals or adding to salads.

Coffee

Coffee has a range of benefits for studying students when consumed in moderation. Coffee can increase alertness and concentration, as the caffeine within coffee blocks the chemical adenosine, which is responsible for making people sleepy. Coffee can also improve a student’s mood when studying as it is linked with the release of “feel-good” chemicals in the body such as serotonin.

Green Tea

Green tea is another great beverage to help students with their studies, as it is rich in antioxidants and polyphenols; chemical compounds which protect the brain from decline whilst improving focus, alertness and memory. Green tea is also a great for reducing anxiety, which can help students relax and overcome the stress of exams.

Nuts

Nuts are also great for students to snack on, especially due to their anti-inflammatory effects which can reduce mental decline. Nuts are also full of health fats, fibre, proteins and nutrients which are not only great for overall health, but also boosting cognitive functioning.

To get in contact with HSC tutors and other tutors in Sydney from LearnMate, please learn more here.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 5 Ways to Best Prepare for the HSC!,The Best Way to Reduce Stress in Year 12: It’s Not What You Think and Study Tips for HSC English This Year!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Brain Foods to Help You Study for Your Exams
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Exam Advice for English Language

Exam Advice for English Language

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, here is my English Language article for October. Historically, the English Language exam has been late in the exam period, although this year it is taking place on October 31 at 2:00pm. Consequently, this is the last article I am writing before the English Language exam, so this article will quite sensibly focus on the exam.

I have already written some articles on the exam, which can be found here:

Advice for the last 24 or so hours before the exam: https://learnmate.com.au/24-hours-before-exam/

Time management strategies in the exam: https://learnmate.com.au/time-management-english-language-exam/

Final tips for the exam: https://learnmate.com.au/final-tips-for-your-exam/

The English Language exam is tough to finish, so reading time is vital. In my opinion, using your 15 minutes of reading time effectively can easily save you more than half an hour of writing time. Using reading time effectively means that you start writing time without having to take the time to formulate plans for your responses, because you have already done that. Therefore, you just put your plans onto paper and get writing, meaning that you spend less time stopping to think about what to write next, and more time writing your responses, covering more ground in greater detail, and hence getting you more marks. My personal recommendation with reading time is to pick your essay topic straight away, so you can start thinking about what to write, and to then work through how you will answer the short answer questions and what you will discuss in the commentary. My advice is to spend most of your reading time on section A, as it will allow you to get through it quickly (Whilst still obtaining as many marks as possible) and have more time for sections B and C, which require extended responses. The time management article goes into some more detail about how I would advise using your reading time, although how you use it will ultimately come down to how you feel comfortable.

How will you know the reading time strategy that you feel comfortable with? Practice exams. I will not spend much time writing about how important practice exams are as I am sure that you are sick of having their importance drilled into you repeatedly. However, timed practice exams that simulate exam conditions (15 minutes reading, 2 hours writing, ideally having not seen the questions and texts before you start) are important as it gets you used to writing under timed conditions and pressure. If you do not finish a practice exam in time, get a different coloured pen and finish anyway, noting how much longer it took you to finish. Additionally, these practice exams are a terrific way of getting feedback from your teacher and clarifying issues in writing style or knowledge, so go and get feedback from your teacher on them.

The final piece of advice I have for you is generic advice which can be used for all your exams (although adapted depending on the time of each exam during the day), which is what to do in the final 24 hours before the exam. I wrote about this in more detail in the first article linked above, so will keep this brief. Go to bed early the night before, ensuring that you get a good night’s sleep and are well rested and refreshed for the exam. In the morning, have a good breakfast with protein and good quality fats (such as eggs and avocado), and as English Language is an afternoon exam, have something to eat around lunchtime as well, avoiding sugar as that will cause you to, “crash,” in the exam. Finally, ensure that you get to the exam with plenty of time to spare, so you do not have the potential stress of being late (and loosing your reading time).

I hope that may articles over the past year have been helpful, and good luck with your preparation and with your exams.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Discussion and Examples of Language Varying to Reflect Identity, Comparing Australian English to American and British Englishes and An Introduction to Unit 4 Area of Study 1


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Exam Advice for English Language
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