Discussion of Scott Morrison’s election announcement.

Discussion of Scott Morrison’s election announcement.

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, the federal election is on Saturday May 18, so I thought that my article for May should focus on a recent example of formal political discourse. For this article, I am using Scott Morrison’s press conference from April 11, where he announced the date for the federal election. This article is not a political commentary, it is simply a discussion of language.

The transcript from the press conference can be found here: https://www.liberal.org.au/latest-news/2019/04/11/press-conference-thursday-11-april-2019 (All ministers have their transcripts available on their departmentally run, non-partisan websites. However, transcripts during the campaign are on the party’s websites as government is in caretaker mode).

Although it is obvious and does not need a lot of attention, the use of Standard Australian English is worth mentioning at the start of a discussion related to a formal text. In this case, you would discuss how the Prime Minister’s use of the overtly prestigious Standard English is appropriate given the significance of his role in society (which he is also actively seeking to retain), and the importance of the announcement he is making. A brief discussion of Standard English enables you to tick off an example, some metalanguage and a key concept of formal language very quickly, so it is worth capitalising on the comparatively cheap marks on offer.

Two of the journalists commenced their questions by addressing Mr Morrison as, “Prime Minister.” This is done to help respect Mr Morrison’s negative face needs by acknowledging the social distance the journalist(s) and Mr Morrison, which arise out of their respective roles in society.

Mr Morrison also uses the modal verb, “will,” extensively throughout this press conference. He does this to express to the Australian voters that should the Liberal National Coalition he leads be re-elected, it is certain that they will keep Australians safe, and increase funding for essential services. These are seen as desirable, so Morrison wants to make people feel certain that they are going to happen, should the Coalition be returned to government. Similarly, he also uses, “will,” to state that should the ALP be elected, taxes are certain to increase and economically destructive polices introduced. These seen as less desirable and Morrison is seeking to highlight this to persuade the Australian voting public to vote for his Coalition.

Morrison also uses parallelisms extensively throughout this press conference. By starting consecutive sentences with, “keeping our economy strong, …” Morrison is seeking to place a heavy emphasis on one of the key platforms of his campaign, before explaining some of the benefits of it (such better wage and job security). Again, by placing an emphasis on this, Morrison is trying to show voters why he should receive their vote.

Parallelisms are very common in formal discourse, especially in politics. Generally, they help to link related ideas and draw attention to the key ideas of the discourse (such as maintaining a strong economy).

Anyway, I hope this has been helpful and I will have another article for you in June.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: What To Expect As A First-Year University StudentSocial Purpose and How it Relates to Informal Language and The Summer Holidays and Formal Language Examples.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Discussion of Scott Morrison’s election announcement.
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Standing out to your Markers

Standing out to your Markers

This article has been written by Celine Badaoui, an HSC Biology & Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Celine then please check out her page here.


Exam markers spend many hours behind a desk marking student’s examination papers, in what proves to be an important but also tedious task. It is therefore essential that students find ways to stand out to their exam markers, with some critical elements in their writing that can distinguish them between a band 5 and a band 6. The following tips will help students in continually improving their exam writing skills leading up to their trial and HSC exams.

 

Know the Syllabus

 

The syllabus is a student’s most important point of reference when studying. It is essential that students commit the contents of their syllabus to memory, in order to know exactly which specific syllabus point is relevant to each question. This is critical for subjects in which some syllabus points are highly similar, requiring students to be able to distinguish between them, as answering questions with content related to the wrong syllabus point can cost them vital marks. To assist with this, study notes should be made directly under the syllabus points. Writing out the syllabus points during study sessions is also effective, helping students memorise the guide.

 

Terminology

 

Terminology refers to using the correct language relevant to each subject, with some subjects such as Biology, PDHPE and Business studies enforcing a high level of importance on the correct use of terminology within student’s answers. Using the correct terminology also requires students to be familiar with the definitions of the terms they are using. Often students may be required to define the terms they use within their answers, or those stated within the question.  To assist with this, students can create a glossary of the key terms they are required to know, defining these terms open book initially, then attempting to do so closed book after some practice.

 

Range of Examples

 

Students should use a range of relevant and contextual examples within their writing in order to back up the points they are making. This illustrates a deeper level of understanding, alongside a student’s ability to apply their knowledge of a topic to the real world. Completing extra readings from the textbook or online is an effective way for students to broaden their knowledge and find interesting examples to impress their markers.

 

Structured Writing

 

Students should aim to write in a way that is well-structured, cohesive and flows effectively, to ensure markers can easily understand and interpret the answers that have been produced. Typically, questions that are 4 marks or higher should include an opening and closing sentence within the answer. The PEEL structure (Point, Expand, Example, Link) is an example of a great structure for students to follow to ensure their writing is clear and concise. Finally, using the amount of marks allocated to a question as a guide to the level of depth students are expected to answer questions in, is an effective way of ensuring students maximise their marks without ‘waffling’ too much.

 

To get in contact with HSC tutors and other tutors in Sydney from LearnMate, please learn more here.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 5 Ways to Best Prepare for the HSC!What are the Different University Degree Levels? and Study Tips for HSC English This Year!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Standing out to your Markers
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What are the Average University Entry Requirements?

What are the Average University Entry Requirements?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


Knowing University entry requirements is key both for choosing subjects for Year 11 and 12 and also to give you a goal to work towards throughout your final years of high school. Let’s look at a few aspects of entry requirements!

ATAR Requirements

ATAR requirements are often the first thing emphasised for courses, but it’s worth remembering that these can be flexible, due to a combination of factors that will be mentioned later.

Consider checking out this site to see the 2019 cut off ATARs accepted into a variety of courses. You can see here the average ATAR scores accepted to a range of institutions. Set a goal for yourself if you’re in Year 12!

Study Score Requirements

Many courses will have required subjects and scores. In Victoria, many courses require a score of at least 25 in either English, Literature or English Language, OR 30 in English as an Additional Language. It is also common for courses to require either Further Mathematics or Maths Methods, and a science subject if that is in the scope of the course.

Bonus points

You can receive bonus points which change your selection rank for the purposes of admissions. This can happen from factors such as where you live, which subjects you studied and applying for Educational Access Schemes. Make sure you talk to someone at your school as early as possible if you believe you are disadvantaged in some way, and enquire about applying for Access Schemes.

However, remember that you need to do your own research on which courses interest you before you choose subjects. It is also important to keep the entry requirements in mind as you continue through Year 11 and 12 and use these requirements as a powerful motivator for future success. There are bridging courses in most universities which will allow you to access courses with requirements you do not meet – it may just take a little more time.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 3 Facts You Should Know About Your ATAR, Tips for Supporting Your Child in Year 11 and 12! and Important Things to Remember About Course Preferences

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

What are the Average University Entry Requirements?
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What are the Different University Degree Levels?

What are the Different University Degree Levels?

This article has been written by Celine Badaoui, an HSC Biology & Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Celine then please check out her page here.


Starting university can be a confusing time for school leavers, especially when they are unsure of the next path to take. Understanding the different levels of university degrees is a good start to help students feel confident when making these decisions and make the most of their time at university.

Associates Degrees

The first level of university degrees is the Associates degree, often requiring a student to have their high-school certificate (or equivalent). Associates degrees are offered at technical schools or community colleges and are typically two years in duration. If students wish to gain an entry-level position for a wide range of jobs including graphic design, air traffic control, nursing and the police, this is a great degree option to provide students with adequate training. Transferable associate degrees are also available for students who wish to continue their education at university after covering the foundation educational requirements. Two of the most common Associate degrees students attain are Associate of Arts and Associate of Science.

Bachelor’s Degrees

The second level of university degrees is a Bachelor’s degree, which also requires students to have a high-school certificate to apply. This is the most commonly chosen undergraduate program for school leavers and often require three to four years full time for completion. Students completing a Bachelor’s degree are given the opportunity to select one or two areas to major in for their studies, with common choices including finance, biology and communications. Upon graduating, students have qualifications to work in entry-level and often management-level positions. Alternatively, students may choose to continue their studies in other graduate programs. A common example of Bachelor’s degree is a Bachelor of Arts.

Master’s Degrees

The third level of university degrees is a Master’s degree. This is a graduate program which gives students the opportunity to specialize in a chosen area of study, which often involve developing a thesis or undertaking major projects. A Master’s degree requires students to complete an additional 1-2 years of study and will often involve some pre-requisites for a student to be eligible to apply. This includes the successful completion of an undergraduate degree, alongside achieving a threshold grade point average (or equivalent) and may even require students to sit an admission exam. Successful Master’s graduates have qualifications to work in advanced jobs in executive positions. A common example of a Master’s degree is a Master of Science.

Doctoral Degrees

The most advanced degree is the Doctoral degree, commonly referred to as a Ph. D. To apply, students must have a bachelor’s degree and in some cases a master’s, alongside other entry requirements such as sitting standardized tests and providing letters of recommendation. Doctoral degrees take several years to complete and involve a major research project. There are differences in Doctoral degrees depending on the field of study, for example medical programs will include the completion of practical clinical hours. Those graduating with a Ph. D with have qualification to work as experts in research. A common of a Doctoral degree is a Doctor of Medicine.

 

To get in contact with HSC tutors and other tutors in Sydney from LearnMate, please learn more here.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 5 Ways to Best Prepare for the HSC!,The Best Way to Reduce Stress in Year 12: It’s Not What You Think and Study Tips for HSC English This Year!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

What are the Different University Degree Levels?
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An Overview of Formal Language

An Overview of Formal Language

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hi everyone, here is my article for April, which focuses on Unit 3, Area of Study 2, (language). This article will briefly look at some social purposes, and features of formal language, as well as some tips on where to find additional texts.

Some of the key social purposes of formal language are listed on the study design. You need to be aware of these purposes of formal language, as well as others. The list on the study design is not exhaustive (note the word, “including”).

Study design: https://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/englishlanguage/englangindex.aspx

Additionally, it is important to be aware that many features will serve more than one purpose. A Kate Burridge quote that I stumbled across when doing some research for this article demonstrates this well. Burridge said in 2006 that, “taboo and euphemism are closely entwined with the concepts of politeness and face.” Essentially, Burridge is using euphemisms (which primarily serves to help negotiate social taboos) as an example to demonstrate how when we speak in more formal settings, participants need to consider how the language they use may reflect on them, but also the face needs of the people with whom you are conversing. Not only is this evidence of a feature having the ability to serve multiple purposes, it also is a good one to keep in your notes as it can be used in essays to support an argument about the purposes of a key formal language feature (features and purposes of formal language are a common essay topic).

Moreover, the key features of formal language are important to be aware of. One key feature of formal language is euphemisms. Euphemisms are sayings which serve to, “soften the blow,” of a statement that relates to a topic which is considered a taboo or difficult to talk about. Euphemisms can present a challenge when it comes to finding fresh examples, as they primarily relate to, “old taboos,” such as bodily functions and death. Furthermore, jargon, (technical language related to a specific domain, such as a workplace) is also a feature which pops up a lot in this outcome. Jargon can serve a myriad of social purposes, depending on the context surrounding its use. Jargon examples tend to be a bit easier to find. These two features are just two of several key formal language features, however this article would be very long if I were to go through them all.

Every English Language student knows examples are important. Formal language examples are all around you. However, politics tends to be a bit of a goldmine, especially in an election year (like 2019). All ministers have their transcripts from speeches and interviews publicly available on their websites, so make the most of them as they are usually littered with examples which are brilliant for essays. It is also common for these transcripts to be texts for your SACs (if they are short answer or commentaries).

Anyway, that’s all from me and I will have another article for you next month.

 

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: What To Expect As A First-Year University StudentSocial Purpose and How it Relates to Informal Language and The Summer Holidays and Formal Language Examples.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

An Overview of Formal Language
read more