How To Structure A Comparative Essay (VCE English Tips)

How To Structure A Comparative Essay (VCE English Tips)

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


The comparative essay, in only its second year of being on the VCE English syllabus, is a cause for confusion for many students and teachers alike. Read on for one simple way to structure a comparative essay.

Introduction

This can be structured in much the same way as a text response essay. Here, the only difference is that you will need to introduce both texts. Do not forget to make use of comparative language, which is an element of the VCAA criteria, which requires that students discuss “meaningful connections, similarities or differences between the texts”. Your introduction must address your overall contention, specific to the prompt, which should be an idea or concept running through your essay.

Body paragraphs

Aim for around two to four body paragraphs, which should be developed using breadth and a wide scope of ideas. A good way to construct these paragraphs is to base each around a premise or main idea, and you will explore both texts through the lens of this premise.

You can choose either to compare both texts throughout the paragraph, or to go into depth in one text and then transition into exploring the other. No matter which method you choose, make you mention to which extent the two texts are similar or different (it's not enough to say “they are different" or “they are similar").

Relate the end of your body paragraph back to the overall contention, bringing both texts explicitly into focus.

Conclusion

Like the intro, this can be very similar to a text response conclusion! Make sure to be clear and concise, and sum up your main points from your body paragraphs. Aim to end with a strong, clear point of analysis, shining new meaning on both texts.

 

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How To Take Notes To Maximise Success2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and Tips on Studying for Exams – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

How To Structure A Comparative Essay (VCE English Tips)
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An Overview of Aboriginal English and its Role in Promoting Identity

An Overview of Aboriginal English and its Role in Promoting Identity

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, this is my second article for the month and once again it relates to Unit 4, Area of Study 1. This article focuses on one of the most interesting parts of this outcome, which is Aboriginal English.

Aboriginal English is a non-standard variety of Australian English which is used by indigenous members of the community (indigenous people make up approximately 3% of the population). Moreover, Aboriginal English plays an extremely significant role in promoting the cultural identity of Indigenous Australians, and has various features which differ from Standard or, “conventional,” Australian English. In terms of your essays, Aboriginal English will often go into a paragraph about cultural varieties with ethnolects.

Most of the features and examples that I discuss in this article are sourced from a document released by the Queensland Courts a few years ago (I cannot track it down online unfortunately).

Firstly, I will discuss some of the main linguistic features of Aboriginal English. The morphology of Aboriginal English has some distinct features from, “conventional,” Australian English. Aboriginal English speakers often do not indicate plurals or tense when they are speaking generally omitting the inflectional morphemes such as, “s,” and, “ed.” Moreover, there are also distinctive syntactic features of Aboriginal English, such as double negatives, and interrogative tags, such as, “eh,” which is used at the end of a declarative sentence to turn it into an interrogative (they (were) sitting outside the bank, eh). Phonologically, Aboriginal English is also a distinct variety of English, as certain phonemes such as, /f/, and, /v/, do not exist in Aboriginal languages are thus often pronounced with /p/, /b/, /t/, or, /d/ instead. Additionally, the /h/ phoneme is also frequently not pronounced by speakers of Aboriginal English. Finally, there are also distinct semantic features in Aboriginal English, such as the meaning of mother, which means a person’s biological mother and all her sisters, and the word camp means home.

Given that this unit is all about the role of language in creating and promoting identity, I should probably talk about what Aboriginal English does in terms of identity. Aboriginal English is covertly prestigious within the communities which use it, and for many indigenous Australians, it is their first language. Furthermore, the practice of code switching also demonstrates the significance of Aboriginal English as a means of promoting indigenous identity. Many indigenous Australians will use Standard English at work, and then revert to speaking Aboriginal English when they are with other indigenous people, demonstrating the language’s covert prestige in Aboriginal communities.

Aboriginal English also helps to reflect the schema and identity of Indigenous people. Aboriginal people’s schema is largely centred around community and the semantics of Aboriginal English, particularly the broadened meaning of Mother help to reflect this attitude. Moreover, the Aboriginal’s belief that they do not own the land, rather that they are the custodians of it is reflected by the fact that they use the word camp to mean land.

I hope you have found this article helpful.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Improve At School Without Opening A Single Textbook, 2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and My Pathway To Becoming A Tutor.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

An Overview of Aboriginal English and its Role in Promoting Identity
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Chemistry – Oxidation & Reduction explained!

Chemistry – Oxidation & Reduction explained!

This article has been written by Stephane Biggs, a VCE Physics, VCE Further Maths, VCE Math Methods & VCE Specialist Maths Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Stephane then please check out her page here.


If you’re like me, you’ll find this chapter terribly confusing in the textbook… But a little explanation can go a long way. It’s actually quite easy to balance redox equations when you know the steps and understand all the terms involved. There are a lot of juicy points that can be scored, so this article will focus on explaining in a simple way what all the terms mean and how to use them in tongue-twisting exercises! First up: oxidation.

Oxidation

Oxidation is the process of oxidizing. It occurs when the charge of the reactant goes up. For example lead oxidizes in the following unbalanced reaction:

Pb —> Pb2+

The charge of the lead (Pb) has gone from 0 to 2+. The charge has increased. In English, we would say that oxidation has occurred. The Pb has been oxidized to Pb2+. Since the charge is going up, oxidation occurs when the reactant loses electrons. Confusing? Don’t think of oxidation in terms of electrons, think of it in terms of charge.

Reduction

Reduction, on the other hand, is the process of reducing. It occurs when the charge of the reactant is reduced (going down). For example H+ ions can be reduced to H2 with the following unbalanced reaction:

2H+ —> H2

The charge of the H+ has gone from +1 to 0 The charge has decreased. We therefore say that reduction has occurred. The H+ has been reduced to H2. Since the charge is being reduced, reduction occurs when the reactant gains electrons.

In summary, when imagining oxidation and reduction in your head – what it means – you need to think in terms of charge. Reduction occurs, when the charge goes down, or is reduced. You mustn’t think in terms of the electrons, because reduction occurs when there is a gain of electrons, which can be quite confusing… so focus on the charge only when picturing oxidation and reduction in your mind.

Oxidants & Reductants

Only once you’ve fully digested what oxidation and reduction mean, should you move onto this subheading. At first sight, it may seem very confusing: when a reactant is oxidized, that reactant is a reductant; on the other hand, when a reactant is reduced, it is an oxidant!

To help explain this seeming contradiction, you need to picture an oxidant as an oxidizing agent. The oxidant will cause the other reactants to be oxidized, even though the oxidant itself is being reduced. The same principle applies in reverse for reductants: they are reducing agents – they cause the other reactants to be reduced.

The best way to make oxidation, reduction, oxidants and reductants part of your vocabulary without having to think deeply about them for 30 seconds every time, is to practice, practice, practice. Very soon, it will all click and make sense. Do plenty of exercises – twice if necessary. Once you fully grasp the meaning of these terms without thinking twice, you will be in a much better position to solve more complex chemistry questions, such as balancing redox equations. If you have any questions, feel free to get in touch.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Improve At School Without Opening A Single Textbook, 2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and ATAR Success Tips from a 99+ ATAR Student!

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LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Chemistry – Oxidation & Reduction explained!
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What To Do When You Get A Bad Mark

What To Do When You Get A Bad Mark

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


Most people will acknowledge that the final year of school can be a real roller coaster of emotions, with the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. Often, the motivation you feel for a subject is closely related to the marks you receive, which can go up and down throughout the year. I remember, in Year 12, receiving a mark I didn’t expect, which had a massive effect on my motivation for that subject.

So how do you recover when suddenly you receive a mark that you really weren’t expecting?

Look at the root of the problem

The first thing to ask yourself is why did you score lower than you expected? If you can trace the root of the problem, the likelihood is that you will be able to adjust this, and improve drastically come the next assessment.

Give yourself a break

If you're feeling like you're stagnating or not making any progress in a subject, you might need to take some time to focus on something else. It's possible that you just need to take a step back, and a break, in order to allow progression in a tricky subject.

Seek outside help

It's important to remember that you don't have to do it alone! If a bad mark is making you feel down, it's definitely worth seeing your teacher to discuss what the problem was and how you can improve. If you don't feel confident asking your teacher, make sure you show your work to friends, parents or a tutor so you know the best way to proceed in the future.

Remember, one assessment’s poor mark does not destine you for a bad final mark. See mistakes as an opportunity to work really hard and improve!

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Improve At School Without Opening A Single Textbook, 2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and My Pathway To Becoming A Tutor.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

What To Do When You Get A Bad Mark
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The Australian accent, and what it does for Australians.

The Australian accent, and what it does for Australians.

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, here is my first article for July and is my second article on Area of Study 1 for Unit 4. Today’s article will focus on the Australian accent, which is regarded as the most significant marker of Australian national identity.

Today I will briefly give an overview of the Australian accent, the three major varieties of the Australian accent (broad, general and cultivated), as well as discussing the significance of the accent for the identity of Australians.

Some key features of the Australian accent are the schwa, /ə/, the non-rhotic /r/ sound (listen to an Australian say a word with the /r/ sound, and then listen to an American say the same word and you can here the distinct difference in the way that the /r/ phoneme is pronounced and stressed), heavily nasalised vowel sounds and flapping the medial /t/, which means that a /t/ sound in the middle of a word is often pronounced with a /d/ sound instead (little said as liddle for example). Moreover, the Australian accent also features a lot of diphthongs, which are where two vowel sounds are pronounced simultaneously, and the way that we pronounce the word, “day,” evidences this.

I will now discuss the main three types of Australian accent and I will be using the lexeme, “bait,” as an example to help demonstrate some of the phonetic differences between the types of accent. The broad Australian accent is a very strong Australian accent, which heavily emphasises the features that I discussed in the last paragraph. People who speak with a Broad Australian accent tend to pronounce bait with, /^'i/. The general accent is more neutral, but still has many of the same features (albeit not as strongly emphasised). Bait is usually pronounced with /^I/ when a general accent is used. On the other hand, the cultivated accent does not have many of the features described in the previous paragraph, and instead is closer to a British accent and people with this accent generally pronounce bait with /eI/. These days, 90% of Australian accents are considered to be general, and this number is increasing.

Furthermore, the accent is also very important to Australian identity. In the Sounds of Aus documentary (which I’m sure you have all watched), Dr Bruce Moore stated that the accent, “defines Australian identity.” Additionally, there are also plenty of real life examples of the accent being used to demonstrate and promote Australian identity. When I was in year 12, I went to a lecture, and the lecturer had attended an international chemistry competition in Turkey a few years prior, and he noticed that his accent subtly broadened for the duration of the trip, suggesting that he was seeking to emphasise the fact that he was Australian and that his accent was his main tool for promoting this identity, (other people who I have spoken to about going overseas have said similar things).

Anyway, I hope you found this useful and I’ll be back soon.

 

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How To Take Notes To Maximise Success2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and Tips on Studying for Exams – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

The Australian accent, and what it does for Australians.
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