Short-Term Or Long-Term Tutoring?

Short-Term Or Long-Term Tutoring?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


As a tutor, I've sometimes been confronted with new students contacting me for last-minute tutoring – even less a week before the final Year 12 exam!

Far more common is students who are searching for one or two lessons to quickly focus on a specific area they struggle with. Whilst short-term tutoring is sometimes quite successful, especially for strong students with a small weakness in one area, it can be frustrating for both parties if the student's overall improvement is not drastic. Of course, I will always help you to the best of my ability, even if it is last minute. But the rewards you reap from tutoring are correlated to the amount of time you give yourself to improve.

The most regular subject I tutor is English. If someone books me for one lesson, I can read over and make suggestions for essays, discuss ideas from a specific text, or perhaps help them develop a time plan for the exam. However, these are short-term solutions, very specific to certain situations. What I love about tutoring is my ability to help students develop skills which will last beyond schooling! When I work with a student over a longer period of time, we can target areas like sentence structure, grammar, written fluency, how to analyse texts and time management: in other words, preparing you not only for English in Year 12, but reinforcing skills that are important throughout life.

In first lessons with my new students, I like to spend some time getting to know them, their interests, their learning style, their targeted areas for improvement and their strengths. This is a really valuable part of long-term tutoring, and it allows me to tailor lessons very specifically to the student, which will result in the best possible outcomes!

If tossing up between short-term and long-term tutoring, always think hard about your aims. What do you want from tutoring?

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Why Perfectionism is a Problem, How to Write a Study Schedule and Tips on Studying for Exams – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Short-Term Or Long-Term Tutoring?
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Which VCE English Subject Should You Choose?

Which VCE English Subject Should You Choose?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


An important choice for every VCE student is which English subject(s) they pick! I studied English Language for one semester but then ultimately opted for mainstream English and Literature in Year 12. I know that making the choice between the three can be confusing, so let's break down the main differences.

All three subjects are essentially different. No single subject is the best fit for everyone: you need to take into account your own preferences and learning style.

Option 1: Mainstream English

Skills you should have or aim to develop: analysis and comparison of texts on a character/idea-based level, as well as what specifically makes a text persuasive.

Mainstream English is generally assumed to be the choice for everyone, but it definitely isn't suited to all! Although it gets labelled the “easiest" option out of the three, if you hate picking apart themes, it might not be the best fit for you. English is based around essay-writing, and you need to be able to adapt to write a few different styles of essay: creative, responding to and comparing texts, as well as analysing persuasive texts. However, if you are just aiming to score over 25, and have reason to be worried about this, mainstream English is most likely the best option.

Option 2: Literature

Skills you should have or aim to develop: very close analysis of more classic texts based on characters/ideas, as well as analysing socio-historical perspectives surrounding the texts.

Literature is a subject for the bookworm. If looking deeply into complex ideas underpinning texts excites you, then you will love Literature. Although a demanding subject, Literature allows a level of freedom in writing and structure which is not possible in the rigidity of mainstream English. Keep in mind that it is a subject which demands a lot of creativity if you're aiming for a high score, and that competition is much higher than in mainstream English. But that said, an authentic interest in the subject is strongly rewarded in Literature.

Option 3: English Language

Skills you should have or aim to develop: analysis of features of language, taking form, structure and context into account, and looking at how they contribute to the nature of communication.

It is often said that science/maths-inclined students should pick English Language, because it tends to be more analytical and focused upon concepts which are perhaps less abstract. This is true for some, however, you should only choose English Language if you have a genuine interest in its subject matter! You shouldn't pick English Language just because you don't like reading… If you hate anything to do with writing, mainstream English is probably a better choice. Like Literature, the competition in English Language is definitely higher, but don't let it discourage you if you have a real passion for the study of language.

Don't forget that you can undertake more than one English study! Often, skills between them are transferrable. But remember, they are definitely essentially different.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: “I went from below 50% in my practice exam to an A+ in the exam”: Interview with a High-Achieving Student, Parent"s Survival Guide – How to Remain Sane & Supportive! and A Brief Analysis Of Formal Language In A Recent Political Interview.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Which VCE English Subject Should You Choose?
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Why Your Perfectionism is a Problem

Why Your Perfectionism is a Problem

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


It's the cliché (and usually insincere) answer to a job interview question, “So… what's your greatest weakness?"

Perfectionism might seem like more of an advantage than a hindrance, but believe me, it definitely can be a problem. Aiming for perfection inevitably leads to disappointment. So what are some ways that perfectionism is obstructing your success?

You can never be fully satisfied

If you find yourself sitting, staring at a blank computer screen and wondering why you can't even write a single sentence you're satisfied with, you may be suffering from standards that are too high. It's important to remember that whenever any of us do something for the first time, it's probably not going to be amazing. Say, if you're writing an English essay, work on switching off that voice in your head saying, “it's so bad!" Once you have a first draft, no matter how terrible it may or may not be, you have something to work with, edit and refine!

Fear of failure

Negative self-talk often accompanies perfectionism, telling you that if what you do isn't perfect, it's not worth doing at all. It's this kind of mentality that leads some perfectionists to never even attempt something that they don't believe they can achieve. But doing nothing is worse than trying and failing. If you avoid mistakes, how will you ever learn?

Possibility of burnout

Perfectionists throughout history have struggled with the high standards and expectations which they place upon themselves. Famous painter Claude Monet was known to destroy masterpieces when dissatisfied, and was quoted saying, “My life has been nothing but a failure." Know that if you have perfectionistic tendencies, you are in good company! However, learn from the mistakes of those before you: you are not perfect, and this does not make you a failure.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: When You’re Your Own Worst Enemy in Year 12 ,Knowledge And Practical Advice For The Final Year Of School : An Interview With A Third Year Music And Japanese Student At University and  Tips on Studying for Exams – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Why Your Perfectionism is a Problem
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Formal Language: An Analysis of An Article Published By the Australian Foreign Minister

Formal Language: An Analysis of An Article Published By the Australian Foreign Minister

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, I figure you guys have all been looking at the budget enough recently, so I won’t write about that again and instead I’ll take a look at a joint media release from Julie Bishop (the Australian foreign minister), Malcolm Turnbull (the Australian Prime Minister) and Christian Potter (the Australian Attorney-General) in relation to the shooting down of flight MH-17. Flight MH-17 was shot down on the 17th of July 2014 and all of the 298 people on board were killed, including 38 Australians. An investigation has recently found that the missile used was supplied by Russia.

A link to the media release can be found here: https://foreignminister.gov.au/releases/Pages/2018/jb_mr_180525c.aspx

Features that I have not really discussed much in these articles are cohesion and coherence. However, they are very important discourse features of formal language (as you would all hopefully know by now). The first three paragraphs all use the word, “findings,” and the repetition of this particular content word enables the first three paragraphs to remain relevant to the recent investigation in relation to the accident and the findings that came from them. In terms of coherence, the article is ordered logically. The article first discusses the fact that the Joint Investigation Team, before discussing the conclusion drawn from them and finally outlines the course of action that Australia and other states such as the Netherlands will be taking. As the paragraphs all build off each other and the information is easy to follow, the order would be considered logical.

Another feature I would like to discuss is the use of modals. The modal, “can,” is used in paragraph 3 and is used to state that only one conclusion is able to be drawn from the findings. Moreover, the modal, “must,” is used in paragraph 5 and this is used to show that the international community is obliged to try and hold Russia to account for the downing of the plane.

Given that this document has a function of informing the Australian people about the findings and what the Australian government intends to do with them, it uses exclusively declarative sentences.

Additionally, the use of jargon helps to keep this release specific. The use of terms such as, “BUK missile system,” help to convey very specific information to the reader, which in turn helps to promote the ministers’ knowledge of the issue and seeks to try and establish their expertise in relation to the issue. However, this is a minor point as the Australian politics students among you will know (or maybe not as you will not have done foreign policy yet), politicians very rarely use foreign policy for political purposes.

Anyway guys, that’s it from me and I hope you have found this article useful.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Scott Morrison’s address to a budget breakfast in MelbourneInterview with experienced LOTE teacher and examiner!When You’re Your Own Worst Enemy in Year.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Formal Language: An Analysis of An Article Published By the Australian Foreign Minister
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Scott Morrison’s address to a budget breakfast in Melbourne

Hey guys, the federal budget was last week, and it is an absolute gold mine for formal language. So, I thought I would make the most of this and discuss some of the language surrounding it. For the purposes of this article, I am using Scott Morrison’s address to a budget breakfast in Melbourne on May 11 this year. Given that this was delivered after the budget, Morrison is seeking to promote the measures in the budget to the Australian people, as opposed to setting them out and explaining them.

Here is a link to Mr Morrison’s speech: http://sjm.ministers.treasury.gov.au/speech/011-2018/

The first feature that I will be discussing is jargon. I could go all day on this, as the treasurer uses it extensively through this address, but I will not. The main type of jargon used by the treasurer in this is economic jargon (this would be expected given that he is the treasurer). Examples of this jargon include, “forward estimates,” (the next four financial years), “expenditure,” “taxes,” “net debt,” and, “surpluses.” Morrison largely uses this jargon to promote his expertise in relation to money and economic management, as well as reinforcing his authority in the area. Jargon can also be seen through the use of initialisms such as GST (Goods and Services Tax), GDP (Gross Domestic Product), and GFC (Global Financial Crisis), further enable Morrison to demonstrate his knowledge on economics, particularly the Australian system.

Another feature that I would like to draw your attention to as the use of, “Unbelieva-Bill.” This is an example of both a blend and a pun. The purpose of this is to try and attack the credibility and desirability of the opposition leader Bill Shorten, after he delivered his budget reply speech. By attacking the credibility of the leader of the opposition, Morrison is also seeking to promote to the audience that his party (or coalition of parties if you want to get technical) is the better and more dependable option to govern, particularly when it comes to economic management.

One more feature that I would like to draw your attention to is the treasurer’s use of pronouns such as, “we,” and, “you.” You is used to help make Mr Morrison’s speech more direct, and he uses this particularly when discussing the budget measures that are more likely seen as being desirable to the audience, such as lower taxes and a stronger economy. Moreover, “we,” is used to refer to both the Australian people and the Liberal National Coalition, and this further seeks to personalise his speech and to promote how it is his party that has made positive economic changes

Finally, I have a little public service announcement for you. If you turn 18 prior to the state election (November 24 this year), you are obliged to enrol to vote and you are obliged to attend a polling place.

Rolls close at 8:00pm on November 6 and a link to enrol is here: https://www.aec.gov.au/enrol/

 

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as:  Analysing The Melbourne Storm Membership Terms And Conditions For The 2018 NRL Season, A Brief Analysis Of Formal Language In A Recent Political Interview and 4 Tips For Texting In The Workplace.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Scott Morrison’s address to a budget breakfast in Melbourne
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