How is University Different from High School?

How is University Different from High School?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


The transition from high school to university can be really tricky for those who can't remember a life outside of school! From the way students are treated, to the amount of responsibility, and the way classes are delivered – so much is dramatically different from school. So what are the biggest changes to expect?

  1. You need to be able to motivate yourself

If you're having trouble motivating yourself to work for school, you may find university even more tough. Professors are more likely to fail you than follow up an assignment you forgot to submit, and there just isn't the same level of support. In some subjects, you can fail if you don't attend enough classes, and teachers don't have to follow up with you if you miss too many classes. This is in part due to class sizes, but the positive side is that teachers expect more of students – you shouldn't be treated like a child any more!

  1. Making friends can be harder

Unlike high school, you probably won't be seeing the same people in every class. So get ready to overcome that awkwardness and introduce yourself to the people in your classes, especially when you first start! If that doesn't work out, don't stress, because unis also usually have a multitude of clubs you can join, which is a great way to meet people with similar interests.

  1. You have so much more freedom!

Compared to high school, the amount of personal freedom you have in university is remarkable. Not only do you have massive holidays, you are free to come and go whenever, you can sort out your own timetable and classes, and you have the freedom to choose how much effort you put into everything. The aphorism, ‘you get out what you put in' is particularly pertinent in this case.

When making the choice whether to apply to go to university, do take into account your own learning style and whether you think it will suit you. The amount of choice and freedom will suit some, but not others. The choice is yours!

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How To Structure A Comparative Essay (VCE English Tips)2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and Chemistry – Oxidation & Reduction explained!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

How is University Different from High School?
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How to Use the Swot-Vac Period

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This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, here is my first article for the month of October. This article focuses on the Swot-Vac period which many of you have or are about to embark upon. As you would know, this period is where you do not have not have any formal classes, although your study will probably be more intense than it has ever been during this time.

This period will be different for everyone, as each school starts this period at different times and each student has a slightly different exam timetable, meaning that different exams will be your primary focus at different times throughout this period. With English Language being one of the later exams (Friday November 16), other exams are (rightly) going to be your priorities earlier during this time. However, it is also important that you do not neglect English Language (and other subjects with later exams), during the earlier stages of this period.

During this period, it is important that you are doing practice exams and revising the key knowledge (and skills) from the year. You should probably be moving towards doing closed book and closed time practice exams, which obviously simulate exam conditions.  Maybe for English Language, you would not be at that stage yet as the exam is still over a month away. Nonetheless, you should be starting to head in that direction. In terms of timed practice exams, if you do not finish it in time, I would still recommend completing the exam in a different coloured pen, meaning you still get to practise your response but are aware that your time management or efficiency needs to improve.

Furthermore, it is vital that after you complete a practice exam, you get feedback. The assessor’s report is a very good starting point when you are reviewing your work, however for writing based subjects (humanities, Englishes, etc.), I would strongly advise getting a human being (a teacher ideally) to read and mark your work as there is a much bigger scope of what constitutes an acceptable response.

Finally, just because you do not have formal classes, it does not mean you will not have access to your school. Your school probably has a place set up for year 12 study. This is really useful if you struggle to study at home, or if you just want a convenient place to meet up and study with your friends/classmates. Additionally, you will still have access to your teachers during this period and I have said this a few times, they are your best resource. They will still be able to see your work, mark your work and give you feedback on it, right up until the exam, so utilise them. Maybe make a weekly appointment with them.

Anyway, I hope this article has helped you and I will have another one out in a couple of weeks.

 

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How To Take Notes To Maximise Success2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and Tips on Studying for Exams – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

How to Use the Swot-Vac Period
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Last Minute Tips for the VCE LOTE Oral Exam

Last Minute Tips for the VCE LOTE Oral Exam

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


VCE language students all know that one of the biggest stresses is the much-hyped oral exam. In the midst of oral exam season, here are some last minute tips to calm nerves and impress those examiners.

  1. Prepare to be surprised

Often students' worst-case scenario is getting thrown a tricky question you weren't expecting, leaving you red-faced and stumbling for words. Make sure you prepare strategies to use up time to allow you to think! This means rehearsing the word for “um” in the language (for example, say ‘あの' or ‘ええと' in Japanese, or ‘euh‘ in French). You should also learn some phrases like, ‘That's a great/interesting question!', and even ‘Would you mind repeating the question?' – even if it's just to buy some time. Asking an examiner to clarify what they mean won't automatically penalise you, as they are often looking to see how you deal with difficult questions. Also, if you get asked a particularly tricky question, take it as a good sign that the examiners think you are a strong student!

  1. Remember the examiners are not there to trick you

Very little inspires dread in students as much as the oral exam and the examiners. However, I remember coming out of my LOTE oral and just about all of my classmates had a better experience than they expected! Examiners are usually very friendly, and they'll try to help you do your best. Even though it's played up to be an intimidating situation, it will go better than expected more often than not.

  1. Talk more than you want to

If you're asked a question such as, ‘Tell us a bit about your family', give more than the absolute basics! Elaborate on things such as your parents' jobs, and how well you get along with your family. Examiners are impressed the more students can say. You can even prepare in advance some ideas on what you're going to respond to basic questions, to feel more confident.

The oral exam is your chance to show off everything you've worked on throughout schooling.  Ultimately, remember that speaking a second language is never easy – no one is perfect!

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Last Minute Advice for the VCE English ExamThe Best Way to Reduce Stress in Year 12: It’s Not What You Think! and Time Management in the English Language Exam

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Last Minute Tips for the VCE LOTE Oral Exam
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Last Minute Advice for the VCE English Exam

Last Minute Advice for the VCE English Exam

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


With the English exam just around the corner, it's the time of year when everyone realises: I need to get my sh*t together. If you haven't done as much work as you should have this year, here are some tips for you.

  1. Read your books

If you haven't already read your English texts, this is essential! Without detailed and specific knowledge of them, and yes, this includes things you can't find on Spark Notes, you are dramatically lowering your results. You need a detailed and comprehensive understanding of these texts.

  1. Start planning to example prompts

Instead of writing essay after essay, practice quickly planning dot points for essays from topics and prompts. This will allow you to practice thinking fast on the spot, just as you will need to do in the exam, and it takes far less time than writing out full essays.

  1. Read the examiner's report

Read the past English exam examiner's reports, as these are full of helpful advice, telling you exactly what the examiners are looking for. You can also often see some great examples of successful students’ writing, which is always useful. Check these out here.

  1. Get some outside help

Get a second set of eyes to check out your essays – their advice might help you see just what you’re missing. Whether it be a parent, sibling, teacher or tutor looking over your work, never feel like you need to do it alone.

  1. Make a study plan

Work out exactly what your goals are in the weeks leading up to the exam. It’s all too easy to put things off over and over again, until it’s too late. Set manageable goals every week (e.g. 2 essays a week, or write one paragraph per day), to make sure that you are getting the amount of practice that you need.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How To Structure A Comparative Essay (VCE English Tips)2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and Chemistry – Oxidation & Reduction explained!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Last Minute Advice for the VCE English Exam
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Time Management in the English Language Exam

Time Management in the English Language Exam

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, here is my second article for September. This focuses on the English Language exam, which is less than two months away. This article will focus on time management in the exam, as the English Language exam is not an easy one to finish. I will break down how I would suggest managing your reading and writing time. Ultimately though, how you use your time is your decision.

Reading time: (15 minutes)

These 15 minutes are crucial. A lot of people underestimate the importance of this time as you cannot mark the paper in any way, however using this time effectively makes an absolute world of difference.

In terms of how to use this time effectively, the first thing that I would recommend you do is choose your essay. As you would know, there are three essay topics to choose from in the exam and you can usually discard one of these quickly. By choosing your essay early, you maximise your time to think about what you are going to write. After that (which admittedly will take less than a minute), the insert should be detached (don’t worry, it is designed to be detached) and you should then read the texts for section A and B. Remember to read the background information too, it’s important. In addition, once you have read the texts for sections A and B, it is probably worth reading the section A questions as well. Further, the second half of your reading time should largely be devoted to section A (which I would recommend doing first). Using this time looking at the questions and text, you should start trying to prepare answers for the short answer questions. By doing this, you enable yourself to complete the short answer section quickly and thus help to give you more time to complete the other two sections. Of course, do ensure you are familiar with your essay and the commentary text.

Writing time: (120 minutes)

When writing time starts, I would recommend writing a quick plan for your essay first and memory dumping anything that is important that you are worried about forgetting (such as examples or metalanguage). After that, I would suggest doing the exam in the order it is given to you. So, section A first, then section B and finishing with the essay. In terms of time management, I would advise having 1 minute at the start of the exam to plan your essay, 20 minutes for section A (including annotation), 45 minutes for the commentary (including annotation), 50 minutes for the essay, and 4 minutes at the end to edit your exam. However, effective use of your reading time may help you to finish some sections quicker.

One final little trick to maximise your time (this goes for all exams), don’t write your student number in right away. Your supervisor will let you write that in after writing time finishes but you can’t write more in your exam.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: How To Take Notes To Maximise Success2U Maths Tips from a Past Student (98 in 2U Maths)! and Tips on Studying for Exams – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

Time Management in the English Language Exam
read more