Attitudes, Accents and Advice for the Holidays

Attitudes, Accents and Advice for the Holidays

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, here is my article for July. This article will cover a couple of things related to unit 4 Area of Study 1, being attitudes to different varieties of Australian English (which are useful for your essays), and a very brief overview of the Australian accent. Finally, I will briefly discuss the mid-year school holidays.

Firstly, the attitudes towards varieties of Australian English. The attitudes towards Australian English are unlikely to be an essay topic in their own right (however it is not impossible), although they are something that students can use to strengthen their arguments, such as those related to how acceptable variations are in certain contexts (see question 8 of the 2016 as an example). Additionally, they may also pop up as a supplementary or secondary party of a question, which would then require you to address them.

The two main attitudes towards language that require discussion for the purposes of this course (by that I mean the two that are expressly mentioned on the study design), are prescriptivism and descriptivism.  Prescriptivists are concerned with the use of language that is, “right,” “proper,” or, “correct.” They believe that these rules are inflexible, and they tend to not be particularly tolerant to variations of language. Conversely, descriptivists are more concerned with the language that people do use, as opposed to what they should use. Descriptivists tend to be more tolerant to variation from the Standard and do not judge people for using variations. Descriptivism can be summed up with a simple sentence. “Non-Standard does not mean substandard.”

Please note that no matter how much of a descriptivist your teacher is, they will mark your writing as a prescriptivist.

Examples of prescriptivism and descriptivism are prevalent in the media, although prescriptivism is especially prominent. This article is one such example of prescriptivism in the media: https://www.theage.com.au/opinion/the-great-australian-speech-impediment-20140801-zzjjx.html#ixzz39NixJZCF.

This article is old (from 2014) so it is not great as an example to actually quote in an essay, however it does give a very good demonstration of a prescriptivist attitude towards language. Some of the things worth noting in this article are how the writer discusses how Steve Irwin’s manner of speaking contained, ‘imperfections,’ and describing examples of connected speech processes as being, “speech mistakes.” Moreover, the writer also says that the standard of written communication is, “unacceptably low,” and that Australia has a national, “speech impediment.”

Secondly, I will now very briefly discuss the Australian accent. There is a continuum of accents, with the broad Australian accent at one end, the cultivated accent at the other, and the general Australian accent (which 90% of Australians speak with) in between. The broad accent places a heavy emphasis on many of the, “classic,” features of the Australian accent, whereas the cultivated accent has a closer resemblance to the British accent (the cultivated accent is exceptionally rare nowadays).

Moreover, the Australian accent is also a significant marker of Australian national identity, and in the Sounds of Aus documentary (which I’m certain you will have watched or will watch very soon), Dr Bruce Moore stated that the accent, “defines Australian language and identity.” I could go into much more detail, but I have a whole article devoted to the accent already, which can be found here: https://learnmate.com.au/the-australian-accent/.

Finally, the school holidays (which will have started by the time you are reading this). These school holidays are a bit different from the others as you are just starting to move into unit 4. My advice would be to use these holidays to revise over unit 3 and to start looking at exam style questions on unit 3 content. Further, I would also try and use these holidays to try and get useful yet time consuming tasks out of the way, making your notes for example (especially for subjects such as legal studies or business management). If you can get a lot of these out of the way, it gives you a good opportunity to use term 3 to do more and more practice questions, to better prepare you for SACs and exams. Of course, it is also important to make the most of the break and to recharge your batteries, as term 3 is exceptionally demanding.

Anyway, that’s all for now and I hope you have found this article useful.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Discussion of Scott Morrison’s election announcement.An Overview of Formal Language and Preparing for your first English Language SAC.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Attitudes, Accents and Advice for the Holidays
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What are the benefits of tutoring?

What are the benefits of tutoring?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


What are the benefits of tutoring? There are so many reasons you might choose to employ a tutor. Let’s explore some of the biggest benefits.

  • Tailored learning. A tutor allows one-on-one time dedicated solely to you, the student. At school, it is likely your teachers will not be able to help you in such depth and detail. A great tutor will tailor course content to the student, unlike in a school environment, in order to make the greatest difference to learning.
  • Immediate feedback. Do your teachers take weeks to return work to you, meaning you can’t easily learn from your mistakes? A tutor can provide immediate feedback, making sure you’re on the right track. This way, you don’t waste time revising material that isn’t totally necessary.
  • Consolidation of learning. It may be that you find it hard to retain information learnt at school. Tutoring sessions are a good time to revise over content and ensure that you have the best strategies to retain this information.
  • Improving academic performance. This is perhaps one of the most common reasons people seek out tutors. It may be that you are struggling in a subject when compared to your peers, or that you are hoping to be achieving elusive top marks – employing a tutor will get you a step closer to achieving your goals.
  • Improving motivation. It can be hard to keep up motivation for a subject you find tricky. However, employing a tutor on a regular basis can help with momentum. Providing a time every week to work on the subject allows you to see tangible improvements and results and can often dramatically improve motivation.
  • Encourages self-directed learning. A tutor is not there to provide a student with all of the answers. Instead, a tutor will help a student to learn in the best possible way, which means student-directed learning. A good tutor will encourage students to attack questions with lateral thinking and creativity. Getting a tutor should ensure a student learns to be more organised, as they should come to sessions well-prepared and ready to learn with questions about the content they are learning at school.
  • Improves self-esteem and confidence. Tutors are dedicated to helping students grow in confidence and knowledge. If a student is willing to put in some work, tutoring will allow them to see positive results in their schoolwork, often improving their self-esteem. While some students may see themselves as ineffective and unintelligent for struggling in a subject, after tutoring, they should be able to better recognise their own abilities.
  • Skills for later life. A good tutor will help a student to learn how to learn, thus equipping the student with essential skills beyond high school. In this way, tutoring is an investment, and will help you beyond the years that you work with a tutor.
  • Competitive edge. If you’re aiming for the highest marks in Year 12, a tutor can help you distinguish yourself in a highly competitive field. It is likely that a tutor is a recent student who achieved exceptional marks, so they can help you follow in their footsteps.

Evidently, the results from tutoring are different for everyone, which is one of the reasons tutoring is so beneficial: it’s flexible, depending on your needs. Have you ever worked with a tutor? What are some of the benefits you observed?

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: What are the Average University Entry Requirements?, What are the Benefits of Online Tutoring? and Managing Your Time While Working and Studying

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

What are the benefits of tutoring?
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Should I Get a Tutor?

Should I Get a Tutor?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


The decision to employ a tutor is not simple. There are a range of reasons to get a tutor, but ultimately it comes down to your personal situation and needs. The best thing you can do is be up-front with a prospective tutor, so that they can tailor their teaching to meet your specific needs. But what are some reasons that you might consider getting tutoring, and what are the different types of tutoring that you might consider?

  1. You’re struggling and feel behind the rest of your cohort. This is perhaps one of the most common reasons students seek out tutoring: simply because they feel behind in a subject and want to catch up to the rest of the students. This is a case where you should consider regular tutoring – when you’re a bit behind in a subject, there is no quick fix. However, if you can regularly work with a tutor alongside putting in the work at home, tutoring is a great investment. A great tutor will not only help you learn the concepts of the subjects you’re struggling with, but they will also help you learn to learn, thus equipping you for life beyond schooling and tutoring sessions.
  2. You want to get some extra help before an exam or assessment task. It’s important to remember that getting a tutor doesn’t mean you have to commit to regular meetings. If you don’t want to spend too much on tutoring or if you don’t feel you need regular tutoring, you should look for tutors who are happy to do occasional tutoring. Most tutors will be fine with this – it’s just important that you are up-front about what you’re looking for so that everyone is on the same page.
  3. You’ve lost motivation and are feeling stuck. A good tutor is more than a simple provider of advice. A good tutor will help to motivate you and inspire enthusiasm for their subject of expertise. It’s important to have someone to cheer you on, someone with your best interests at heart who is invested in helping you constantly grow – tutors love to see their students develop and improve! A tutor is a great source of support and encouragement.
  4. You want to improve, but don’t know how. In your final year at school especially, it’s the smallest details which can be the difference between good marks and great marks. Tutors are equipped with valuable experience, resulting in tips and advice for very specific situations, like exams and assessment tasks. If you don’t know how you can get better and your teachers don’t have enough time to help you, consider asking a tutor.
  5. You’re interested in learning from top-scoring students. Tutors are usually recent students with exceptional results. Generally younger than your teachers and parents, their teaching styles can often be better tailored to students, because they are uniquely able to relate to the specific situations that students are in. Former students have subject expertise as well as the recent memory of being in the same situation as you: a tutor can be a role-model, whose footsteps you can follow in.
  6. You’re aiming for those top marks. If you’re looking to get scholarships and gain accolades, a tutor can prove crucial to gaining that competitive edge, as most very high scorers work with tutors. Tutors should have a wealth of resources which will come in handy. A tutor will draw out the best in you and help you to hone your abilities so that you can be at your best.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: What are the Average University Entry Requirements?, What are the Benefits of Online Tutoring? and Managing Your Time While Working and Studying

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Should I Get a Tutor?
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An Introduction to Unit 4 Area of Study 1

An Introduction to Unit 4 Area of Study 1

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hey guys, here is my article for June, which will provide an overview of unit 4 Area of Study 1. As you are probably aware, unit 4 focuses on language variation and identity and Area of Study 1 is primarily focused on Australian national identity and the language variation within Australia (especially regional and cultural). Further, AOS 1 also looks at the attitudes of prescriptivism and descriptivism (this article will not discuss attitudes although they are a common essay topic).

The first thing I would like to address in this article is examples. I have said it before and will say it again, examples are absolutely vital if you want to do well in this subject, especially in unit 4 as it tends to be more essay based and many students prefer to write essays on unit 4 topics in the exam. Unit 4 examples are everywhere. Scott Morrison’s speech claiming victory in the recent election is one example, where much of Mr Morrison’s rhetoric was focused on promoting a strong sense of Australian national identity. Examples are also very prominent in popular culture, on social media and in the media in general. My advice would be to always be on the look put for examples and set aside around half an hour per week to actively search form them. A good way to do this is to type in key words from the course into Google News and see what comes up there.

In terms of what to look for when it comes to examples and what you will be discussing in Unit 4 AOS 1, a couple of the key features of Australian English that you will need to be across are (this list is far from exhaustive):

  • Slang: Slang is informal language (generally words) that usually relate to a specific demographic. For example, ‘salty,’ is commonly used by people online (usually aged between 15-40) to describe someone who is angry or upset about something (and not food that has been over-seasoned).
  • Colloquialisms: Very similar to slang except it is more permanent and less related to generation or social group. For example, ‘mate,’ is a common colloquialism in Australia (please use better colloquialisms than this one in your essays unless you find a really good and current example).
  • The high tolerance of taboo language: Australians have a very high tolerance of taboo language and it is quite common in Australian society and people tend not to be offended by it in the same way that people in other countries tend to be (old example, but think back to the, “where the bloody hell are you,” tourism advertisements.
  • Diminutives: Where a word is shortened with a suffix such as, “ie,” “y,” or, “a,” (the process is called suffixation), a diminutive is usually created. These are very common in Australia and are frequently used for nicknames among many other things. One example of diminutives is, “parma,” which is a diminutive of, “parmigiana.”

“Parma,” as my example for diminutives was not an accident. It links me onto my next point, which is regional variation. Whilst Victorians tend to use the diminutive, “parma,” when referring to the Italian dish that is very popular in Australia, people in South Australia and Queensland generally prefer to use the shortening, “parmi.” In searching for an example on Twitter, I stumbled across a tweet from a seemingly disgruntled voter (from Victoria) after the election results came out, which stated, “can you really rely on a state that calls it a parmi instead of a parma to help out in an election?” Moreover, there is also other lexical variation around Australia (look up Macquarie University’s Australian voices to find some examples, although it is a bit old), and some phonological variation. Once again, it’s South Australia at odds with the rest of Australia. Although most of Australia pronounces the, “a,” in words such as, “dance,” “chance,” and, “advance,” using, /a:/ (as in words such as trap), South Australians are more likely to use, /ae/ (as is used in words such as bath).

Finally, cultural variations such as Aboriginal English are also important in this area of study. I have already written an entire article on Aboriginal English, which can be found here: https://learnmate.com.au/overview-of-aboriginal-english/

That’s all from me and I will have another article for you in July.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Discussion of Scott Morrison’s election announcement.An Overview of Formal Language and Preparing for your first English Language SAC.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

An Introduction to Unit 4 Area of Study 1
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Tips on how to be a Good Tutor

Tips on how to be a Good Tutor

This article has been written by Celine Badaoui, an HSC Biology & Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Celine then please check out her page here.


Tutoring is a fulfilling and important role many students take on following the conclusion of their high school studies. There are several ways a tutor can ensure they are performing this role to the best of their ability, to ensure their students are getting the most out of lessons.

 

Be Adaptable

 

Every student is unique in their approach to learning; therefore, it is essential that tutors are adaptable to a range of their student’s needs. It may take a few sessions to work out the type of student they are and how to best structure a lesson for them. For example, some students are much shyer and quieter than others and don’t like to express themselves, therefore tutors must make sure they consistently ask them if they are understanding the content of the lesson, as they may not want to let you know themselves. Other students are more outgoing and love to chat, so it is important keep them focussed, particularly if they are prone to distractions.

Provide a Variety

 

Attending tutoring is not typically a thrilling activity for most students, however there are several ways to keep students motivated and maintain their attention for the duration of a lesson. Using a variety of methods when teaching that go beyond just discussing the content with students is therefore highly important. Examples of ways to achieve this can include showing students a range of relevant videos, drawing diagrams to illustrate certain concepts and proving a range of past questions for students to complete. This will stimulate various parts of a student’s mind and make their learning experience more engaging.

 

Be Friendly

 

An obvious but crucial tip on being a good tutor is to be a friendly tutor. It is absolutely essential that tutors are perceived as approachable by their students, in order to ensure they feel completely comfortable to ask questions and letting their tutor know when they don’t quite understand. Some ways to achieve a friendlier persona when tutoring includes smiling, engaging in conversation (for example, asking how a student’s day at school was), and ensuring a friendly body language such as sitting at eye level to the students and leaning slightly forward when listening to them speak to demonstrate attentiveness.

 

Be Organised

 

It is important that tutors are organised when it comes to their lessons, particularly if they are tutoring a number of different students. This ensures that both students and tutors feel they have made the best use of the lesson duration time. Tutors can achieve this through creating lesson plans prior to each lesson with a general schedule of what they’d like to achieve, alongside having other materials such as pre-prepared quizzes, worksheets and past papers ready to go. It is also important that tutors review the content they plan to teach prior, especially if they have not gone over it for a while. Keeping track of the content taught can be achieved effectively through the use of the syllabus as a guide.

 

Provide Encouragement

 

Finally, a good tutor must always provide endless encouragement to their students. Giving constructive criticism regarding a student’s work can be hard for both tutors and students at times, therefore it is important these comments are met with encouraging words, noting that students will learn from their mistakes and perform better next time. It is essential tutors always point out the good achievements of students as much as they make note of their mistakes. Providing encouragement should go beyond the work completed in lessons, as the HSC is a stressful time, tutors should often check in on how students are coping and provide positive encouragement and motivation to help them all the way to the end.

To get in contact with HSC tutors and other tutors in Sydney from LearnMate, please learn more here.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: What are the Different University Degree Levels?,Standing out to your Markers and HEALTH during the HSC

 – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Tips on how to be a Good Tutor
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