Why Student Leadership is Important

Why Student Leadership is Important

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


What has leadership got to do with school? Some might say nothing at all. Others might try to push you into applying for opportunities, such as sports, arts, music or school captain leadership roles. Before you say you can’t be bothered, or before you assume that it isn’t rewarding enough to put yourself forward for such opportunities, let’s consider some of the potential benefits. How could leadership opportunities apply to your real life?

  • Communication skills. Taking on a leadership position means you will certainly have the opportunity to practise your communication skills with a wide range of people and in many different ways, including public speaking, liaising with teachers and parents, communicating with your peers and even resolving conflicts. Communication skills are highly sought after in nearly every possible career path, so you can be assured you will develop skills essential to the rest of your life.
  • Sense of empowerment. Students granted access to leadership are able to feel the satisfaction of knowing they are contributing towards making a difference, on whatever scale it may be. Students should have a voice in their schools, so take pride in your position and make sure you are vocal about the issues you care about if you are given the chance to lead!
  • Problem-solving skills. Leaders will inevitably be faced with problems and forced to make difficult decisions. It is highly beneficial for young people to have the chance to solve problems, think creatively and in this way work alongside others. If you are working on attacking problems in an innovative way, this is a great ability which will apply to countless more situations in your life.
  • Step outside your comfort zone. Throughout your life you will be confronted with opportunities that might make you uncomfortable to even consider doing. It can feel risky to take on a position you have no experience with, but step outside of your comfort zone and embrace the challenge! You can never predict exactly how it will turn out and you have nothing to lose.
  • Develop team-work skills. The best leaders are collaborators, people who are willing to listen to others’ input and take that into consideration. Another highly sought-after skill in most professions is the ability to work successfully in teams, and leadership in school is a great opportunity to work on this skill.
  • Build up your resume. Having any leadership experience is looked upon favourably by employers down the track as it is seen as a demanding role: if you have the chance to get leadership experience, you should take it. You never know where a small leadership role at school might help you reach.
  • Achieve success in a non-academic forum. You may not feel at home with memorising definitions and studying for hours upon end, but this doesn’t mean you would be a bad leader. Taking on a leadership role and doing a good job is a very highly regarded form of success which is not tied to academics.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 3 Facts You Should Know About Your ATAR, Tips for Supporting Your Child in Year 11 and 12! and Will anyone care about your ATAR in a year?

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Why Student Leadership is Important
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Strategies for Success in English Language

Strategies for Success in English Language

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hello everyone, here is my January 2020 article. Is there any better way to start a new year than with an article about your forthcoming school year? Absolutely, I am certain that there are a thousand ways that are better to start the new year than reading an article about school. However, I am writing this anyway, so I thought it might be useful to discuss some general strategies for success in English Language.

Firstly, I will discuss examples. In this course, contemporary Australian examples are absolutely vital to writing successful essays. Provided that they are well explained and appropriately used, they show that you are aware of the world of language around you and that you have a better understanding of the content. I have previously discussed how important examples are to this course, however I cannot place enough emphasis on how important they are for performing well in this course (and any competent teacher will also stress the importance of examples to you).

Good examples that you can use in your essays can be found just about everywhere. Television, the internet, text messages and even your conversations with friends, family, colleagues or teachers will most likely be able to provide you with examples to discuss and analyse. Moreover, simply typing some key words from the course into Google News, and seeing what pops up in relation to it is a very good way of finding examples and discussion of language. If you see or hear something that may be interesting, note down what you saw/heard, as well as a bit of context so you can effectively discuss how and why it was used in the manner that it was (have an example bank somewhere, maybe even something like a shared OneNote with your classmates) . If you are unsure about an example, take it to your teacher or tutor and try to discuss it with them. They will most likely be ready, willing and able to help you analyse it and work out where it is appropriate to be used in essays. Examiners (and teachers) absolutely love to see interesting, contemporary, and Australian examples of language being used in essays, and showing the person marking your work what they want to see (provided that it is used appropriately) is a sure fire way to improve your marks.

Secondly, practice is also extremely important to this course (as it is to any other subject). In this course, you are ultimately assessed on your ability to show your knowledge of the content in short answer sections, analytical commentaries, and essays. Consequently, it is worth practising writing these, as you want to make sure that you can effectively convey the information that you have learned to the person marking your work. The last thing you want is to know the content, but be unable to use the appropriate skills to demonstrate that knowledge, so practising the skills required by writing in the formats used for the exam will enable you to avoid this problem. Also, make sure that you continually get feedback on your work to track your progress and ensure that you learn from any mistakes that you may have made.

Finally, have a look at the study design before you go back to school. The study design has a list of metalanguage for units 3 and 4 (pages 17 and 18), and subsequently lists the key knowledge and skills for units 3 and 4. You are assessed on the key knowledge and the key skills, so it is worth familiarising yourself with those (not in any kind of detail, but just have a look at where you are heading towards throughout the year).

Anyway, I hope this article has helped you, that your new year has started well and that you enjoy the rest of your summer break.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Discussion and Examples of Language Varying to Reflect Identity, Comparing Australian English to American and British Englishes and Transitioning in to Units 3 and 4


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Strategies for Success in English Language
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Tips on Writing your First Student Resume

Tips on Writing your First Student Resume

This article has been written by Celine Badaoui, an HSC Biology & Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Celine then please check out her page here.


Resumes are an important tool for anyone entering the workforce, as they allow individuals to make a great first impression to their potential employers. Students may find it challenging to write their first resume, as they have not had the same practice in doing so. However, there are many handy tips in this easy-to-follow guide for students to write a resume that will present them in the best way possible.

Overall Objective

A great way to start a resume is with an overall objective; a few sentences to summarise yourself and your aims for entering the workplace. It is highly effective if students make this section job-specific, which may require them to slightly edit their resume for each different job they apply for.

Skills and Attributes

Next, students should include a clear list of their skills and attributes which would make them a valuable employee in the workplace. These can be divided into soft skills and hard skills, both of which are important for an individual to include. Soft skills are described as traits that make you a good employee, for example, being a ‘good collaborator within teams’, or being ‘self-motivated with a strong work ethic’. Hard skills refer to more measurable and technical abilities, such as being ‘proficient in various software’s including Microsoft Office PowerPoint and Excel’. Students should aim to list at least 10 of their most promising skills and attributes in this section of the resume.

Education

A student’s educational attainment should then be included on their resume. This can include where they went to school and completed their final exams. Indicators of marks such as their ATAR can also be included, however this is optional. If students are enrolled in university, the name of their institution as well as the degree they are complete (e.g. Bachelor of Science majoring in Biology) should also be included.

Previous Employment and Work Experience

Next, a critical part of any resume is the inclusion of previous employment and work experience, as this will often be the most important aspect looked at by employers. Previous employment refers to paid employment, whilst work experience often refers to unpaid placements or internships. The duration and/or year in which this employment or work experience took place should be included, followed by the title of the position, for example, 2019: Waitressing staff at Betty’s Burgers. Following this, students should include a short description of their role as well as a list of skills and attributes attained from this position, with specific examples. For example, ‘responsible for waitressing, managing phone orders and cleaning – developed skills in multitasking and improved communication through customer service’. Any licences or certifications can also be included here, such as the licence for Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA) or drivers’ licence.

Awards and Achievements

It is also very beneficial for students to include a list of their notable awards and achievements on their resumes. These can include scholarships, academic achievements as well as those from extracurricular activities. For example, HSC all-rounder awards, attainments in Duke of Edinburgh or sporting achievements.

Interests

Finally, the inclusion of some interests in a student’s resume is a great way to show employers more aspects of an individual’s lifestyle and personality. This section should be kept short, with some examples including sports, travelling and reading.

To get in contact with HSC tutors and other tutors in Sydney from LearnMate, please learn more here.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: 5 Ways to Best Prepare for the HSC!,The Best Way to Reduce Stress in Year 12: It’s Not What You Think and Study Tips for HSC English This Year!

 – LearnMate Tutoring.

 


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Tips on Writing your First Student Resume
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What Are The Different Types of Learners?

What are The Different Types of Learners?

This article has been written by Lydia McClelland, a VCE French, Music Theory, Literature & VCE English Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Lydia then please check out her page here.


Schooling is often presented in a ‘one-size-fits-all’ kind of manner – it’s very difficult for teachers to tailor teaching to a variety of styles. However, there’s a good reason why this doesn’t work for everyone: there are different learning styles. Different learners have a set of unique characteristics, which directly influences the ways these people can best learn information and therefore perform at school tasks. So, what are some of the different types of learners?

There are several theories of learning styles. One well-known theory is the multiple intelligence theory by Howard Gardner, which puts forth seven learning styles:

  • Visual (spatial): these learners might prefer to draw or doodle their ideas out on the page or in a visual way. Visual-spatial learners often learn well by note-taking, which uses colour-coding or mind maps. These learners are able to memorise information best when it is shown through images, relying on their visual memory.
  • Aural: these learners might prefer not to learn through reading. These people learn best when they hear information, and in learning information, they often benefit greatly from discussions. Aural learners are great at noticing audible changes.
  • Verbal (linguistic): these are learners who have a great affinity for words and for writing. People with this learning style would benefit from using word tricks like mnemonics to memorise information.
  • Physical (kinaesthetic): these learners don’t do well being confined to a classroom. Instead, they learn best when they are being active, using their hands or body to understand how to do something. Physical learners are active people, who don’t like to sit and listen or read for overly long periods of time.
  • Logical (mathematical): these learners love numbers and are particularly adept at logical and mathematical reasoning. If you see patterns in anything and are great at classifying information into groups, you might very well be a logical-mathematical learner.
  • Social (interpersonal): these learners are very skilled at communication and socialising – they are finely attuned to other people. This means that they will probably excel best in situations where they are able to work with others, and not just alone.
  • Intrapersonal: this is a more introspective, solitary style. These learners prefer to learn privately, and may benefit from ensuring that they have a study space which is quiet and where they are unlikely to be interrupted.

Others have focused on the three main categories of learning styles:

  • Visual: processes information through images, graphics, charts, or graphs. Often said to be the most common style, so this is often catered to by traditional education.
  • Auditory: processes information when it is heard, or by talking things through.
  • Kinaesthetic: processes information through recreating or practising. Often said to be the least common style, or at least the style which is helped least by traditional education or schooling.

In tutoring, I have often asked students to identify which of the three main categories they best fit in. This is very helpful as I can tailor my teaching styles to meet each style.

How can you identify which learning style you have?

First of all, it may be evident to you from the above descriptions which style you have. But many of us have a mixture of more than one style, so can benefit from learning about them all. If it’s not clear, why not check out an online quiz which could give you a score on which of the main three learning styles you prefer. Check out this test or this test to learn more.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as:

The Importance of Personal Development, How to Speed Read and Will anyone care about your ATAR in a year?

 – LearnMate Tutoring.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

What Are The Different Types of Learners?
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Short Answer Sections and Summer Holiday Advice

Short Answer Sections and Summer Holiday Advice

This article has been written by Liam McAlary, a Years 7 – 12, VCE Legal Studies and VCE English Language Tutor at Learnmate. If you’re interested in private tutoring from Liam then please check out his page here.


Hello everyone, here is my last article for 2019, which will discuss short answer sections and the forthcoming summer holidays.

 

Short answer sections (Section A of the exam)

As you may be aware, the unit and 4 English Language exam has 3 sections. The first of these sections is worth 15 of the 75 marks available and is a series of short answer questions about a given text. Moreover, these short answer sections are commonly used for SACs, especially in Unit 3 (which focuses on the nature and function of formal and informal language). Short answer sections are typically 4-6 questions, and relate to a text provided, usually requiring you to discuss an array of features of the text. Consequently, knowing metalanguage and how to apply it correctly is especially crucial to doing this section well, and numerous assessment reports have mentioned that deficiencies in a student’s knowledge of metalanguage are exposed in short answer sections (Please note that according to the 2018 assessment report, there is often a correlation between poorly done short answer sections and doing poorly with the rest of the exam, as you put into the examiner’s head that you do not know what you are talking about). Moreover, as well as knowing metalanguage and being able to use it (there is usually a question that specifically requires metalanguage to be used), you also need to be proficient at identifying language features and discussing why they have been used, in the specific text. Assessors do not like generic responses that simply identify a feature and provide a generic purpose, they want specificity. Further, make sure that you know which features come under which subsystem. You can use the metalanguage list on pages 17-18 of the study design (the study design is linked at the end of the article) to get a guide on what to put where.

Additionally, it is important to include sufficient detail in your answers to short answer questions, although it is equally important that you do not write too much, as the exam (and potentially SACs) can be a challenge to finish, so you do not want to spend time writing more than necessary, wasting time for no marks.

Further, it is also important to mention that short answer questions often relate to certain line numbers (see question 2 of 2017 as an example), so make sure that if that is the case, your responses relate to features within those lines (any discussion of those features outside of those lines will simply not be marked).

Summer holidays:

When you are reading this article, your summer holidays will either be imminent or will potentially have already started. I have written previously about how to utilise school holidays, so I will keep this section very brief. The summer holidays will be different for different students, depending on what preliminary work they have done at school, and what they have subsequently been assigned to do over the holidays. My advice would be to (if you can) get as much of the work done quickly and get it out of the way, so you can properly relax and enjoy your well deserved (and much needed) summer break. Further, if you feel that you may want a tutor for English Language, it may be worth engaging one for a lesson or two over the summer, in order to see how you work with a particular tutor (and potentially getting a bit of a head start).

Finally, enjoy your summer break and use it as a chance to recharge your batteries, because year 12 is taxing and you will need all the energy you can muster.

Anyway, I hope this article has been helpful, and that you enjoy your summer break.

If you loved this article, you will LOVE all of our other articles, such as: Discussion and Examples of Language Varying to Reflect Identity, Comparing Australian English to American and British Englishes and Transitioning in to Units 3 and 4


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all primary & high school subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

LearnMate provides you with tailored, one-on-one lessons for tutoring in a variety of suburbs in MelbourneSydneyGeelongBrisbaneHobartCanberraPerth & Adelaide! With hundreds of tutors on the LearnMate platform, you’re bound to find someone local for any primary or high school year level! You can choose to have lessons in-person or online – whatever is easiest for you!

Short Answer Sections and Summer Holiday Advice
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