Aboriginal English in the Media! Read Now :)

No comments

I will be running the most comprehensive workshop for VCE English Language 3/4 these coming spring holidays, with a particular focus on EXAM REVISION. To find out more, please go here https://www.facebook.com/events/1553209228056993 or here http://www.learnmate.com.au/workshops/english-language/

Don’t miss out – my workshops always sell out every holidays – and I have got so much planned for you. This is the perfect opportunity to be confidently set for your exam! VCE is a marathon and not a sprint, so persistence is key to succeeding in your studies! You see past testimonials from past attendees by clicking the links above!


Aboriginal English in the Media! Read Now 🙂

Hi everyone!

In today’s article, I want to look at an example of Aboriginal English in the media and how you can include this in an essay. Many students study Aboriginal English in Term 3, so knowing how to identify its features and talk about it in an essay is absolutely vital!

Firstly, it must be noted that I simply didn’t look for Aboriginal English in the media. I merely came across it when reading an article online, and thought ‘oh that’s an example of Aboriginal English’. As an EL student, it’s important that you do your own research and but oftentimes, the examples in the media will not be explicit; instead they will be implicit.

Please read the article here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-07-20/aboriginal-shelter-pushes-human-history-back-to-65,000-years/8719314

Beyond the fact that the information presented in this article is extraordinarily fascinating, what is more relevant for EL is the excerpt spoken by Mirarr traditional owner May Nango (towards the middle of the article). I have included the excerpt below. It also must be noted before continuing that Aboriginal English isn’t just restricted to one variety – there are various dialects within Aboriginal English.

A few things to note:

  • The use of code-switching in ‘Balanda’
  • The use of ellipsis in the removal of the primary auxiliary verb (are) from ‘to be’
  • The use of possession marked by juxtaposition (country belong to Mirarr)
  • The use of inverted syntax – “everywhere digging”.

What else can you see in the above excerpt? The above list isn’t complete!

So how do we include this in an essay? See an excerpt below of how I would include this along with a linguist example:

In a recent media example, in response to the recent discoveries of Aboriginal artefacts, Madjebebe site custodian May Nango displayed many quintessential examples of Aboriginal English in her speech. For example, Nango demonstrates her indigenous heritage through code-switching in the phrase ‘now the balanda comes and cleaning up’, where ‘balanda’ is defined as ‘non-indigenous people’. According to Diana Eades, “Aboriginal English plays an important role in the maintenance and assertion of Aboriginal identity”, and through features such as code-switching, Nango is able to actively reflect her indigenous heritage.”

Enjoy! 🙂


I will be running the most comprehensive workshop for VCE English Language 3/4 these coming spring holidays, with a particular focus on EXAM REVISION. To find out more, please go here https://www.facebook.com/events/1553209228056993 or here http://www.learnmate.com.au/workshops/english-language/

Don’t miss out – my workshops always sell out every holidays – and I have got so much planned for you. This is the perfect opportunity to be confidently set for your exam! VCE is a marathon and not a sprint, so persistence is key to succeeding in your studies! You see past testimonials from past attendees by clicking the links above!

Aboriginal English in the Media! Read Now :)
read more

Life After VCE – Is An Arts Degree Worth It?

No comments

Life After VCE – Is An Arts Degree Worth It?

This article was written by Lauren Castle, a current VCE English and Literature tutor. Lauren is currently accepting students, so if you’re interested in her services, you can see her profile here


In defence of the Arts degree: flexibility and change during life after school

When I left school I wanted to be ‘like, a serious literary writer’. I was a self-confessed literature snob who raved about Jane Eyre, and turned my nose up at young adult fiction (sorry Hunger Games). I had harboured aspirations to become a psychologist in my mid high-school years, taking psychology as my ‘early’ VCE subject in year 10; but after excelling in English, and dedicating large quantities of my free-time in year 12 to developing my creative writing skills, I just really wanted to be an author.

After completing my VCE in English, English Literature (a second English to compensate for no maths subjects), Classics, Health, Studio Arts and Psychology, I decided a Bachelor of Arts (BA) was the the most suitable degree. My parents were wary of me embarking on a BA. I remember going to an information session with my dad who was sceptical about the value of studying Arts at university; “they’re all having to do further study”, he observed with disapproval, after listening to some Arts students speak about their degrees. He completed a BA after leaving school, and struggled to find work in his field, eventually returning to university to gain qualifications in accounting. My dad encouraged me to major in communications or PR, and said that psychology was a good way to go as far as acquiring vocational knowledge. Determined to continue on my journey to becoming a ‘proper writer’, while mindful that I needed expertise in something that would give me reliable employment and financial security, I settled on a double major in psychology and literary studies.

I did really well in my literature coursework in my first year at university, and met a lot of cool people with similar interests to me (i.e. reading and talking (well, arguing) about books). The only problem – it was so, so boring. I realised that studying literature at uni basically consists of tonnes of required reading – that is, of books that I had very little interest in. This was a problem because I like to read what I like to read depending on my interests, mood, the time of year etc. and reading that is not prompted by an intrinsic desire to consume the story at hand can be torturous. I recall starting a Victorian literature unit, turning up to the first class and having our professor warn us that the unit would require a lot of long, dense reading of really old texts. Needless to say, I did not return to that class.

On the other hand, I was thoroughly enjoying my psychology classes. I spent lectures absorbed in the course content, and every chapter of my textbook unlocked great secrets of the human mind that just had to know. I was also excelling in sociology, which I had formerly intended to minor in. Upon the commencement of second year, I decided that I would be far better off changing my literature major to sociology, which is a subject that I am passionate about and complements my psych major beautifully. I have now rekindled my dream of becoming a clinical psychologist, and intend to pursue further qualifications in this field. This does not mean I will not be a writer – quite the opposite, in fact. Now that I don’t have to waste my reading and writing time on topics and books that I do not care about, I can follow my interests to my heart’s content, and my writing has benefitted from this.

If you’re considering a BA, you are probably subject to sceptical family members, teachers and other snooty students pursuing more vocational degrees: ‘sure, if you really want to work at McDonalds for the rest of your life’. This disempowering attitude stems from a lack of understanding about what Arts degrees are in terms of their content and function. They are often slammed for being a bludge, and a ‘dead end’ career-wise, but this is not the case. For some reason I always hear about people saying that Arts students should ‘go do something worthwhile’ and study engineering or something. The fundamental flaw in this logic is worthy of ridicule. Apparently I, a person who achieved 16% on my year 10 (and final) maths exam should go be an engineer. Thanks world, great advice. What happens when we have terrible buildings, and cars that don’t work because Arts students have been told to ditch their frivolous arty pursuits and take up engineering?

The fact of the matter is, no – most arts majors are not ‘vocational’. That does not mean they are not valuable, it just means they don’t teach you how to do conventional jobs. So yes, you probably will have to do either a double degree or further study (i.e. Masters) to get work in your field. For me, the extra years of study I will have to complete to become qualified in my field are worth it. The most important thing about choosing a university degree is following your strengths and interests towards a fulfilling career. With this in mind, recognise that you will change, your interests will change – that is the only thing we can really be certain of.


LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

CLICK HERE TO SEARCH FOR A TUTOR NOW!
Life After VCE – Is An Arts Degree Worth It?
read more

Thermochemical Equations

No comments

WHAT IS A THERMOCHEMICAL EQUATION?

This article was written by Henry Ja a current VCE Chemistry and Legal Studies tutor. Henry is currently accepting students, so if you’re interested in his services, you can see his profile here


In Year 11 you would have learnt how to balance a chemical equation. In many cases, it’s a trial and error process when attempting to balance.

In Unit 3 you will would have learnt about ‘thermochemical equation’, but what are they?

In simple terms, a thermochemical equation is a balanced chemical equation with ∆H value.

Before we look further into thermochemical equations we first need to understand what ∆H is.

  • ∆H (delta H) is known as the enthalpy change. ∆H represents the energy change of a chemical reaction.

Reactions can either release (exothermic reactions) or absorb (endothermic reactions) energy, and ∆H allows us to determine if a reaction is either one of the two.

  • ∆H values contain both a sign and number.

In exothermic reactions, the ∆H has a negative sign, whilst endothermic reactions the ∆H has a positive sign.

Now that we have established what ∆H represents, let’s see if we can apply that to an example.

The reaction above is a combustion reaction of methane. You should know from your readings that a combustion reaction releases energy. But other than from your general knowledge how else can we tell this reaction releases energy, and hence is an exothermic reaction?

  • The ∆H value!
  • ∆H value here is –890 kJ/mol which tells us that for every mol of methane combusted 890 kJ of energy is released.

***The reverse reaction would be an endothermic reaction. The ∆H value would have the same numerical value but different sign.

Key points to remember:

  • A thermochemical equation is made up of a balanced chemical equation & ∆H value. (VERY IMPORATANT)
  • The ∆H value can tell us whether a reaction is exothermic or endothermic.
  • ∆H is SPECIFIC for a SPECIFIC chemical equation.
    • Changing the states of the reactants and products will result in a different ∆H value.
    • If the coefficients in the chemical equation is changed, then the ∆H value will also change.
  • kJ/mol is JUST a unit. It does not always mean for every mol of a substance ‘x’ amount of energy is released. You need to look at the equation you are given and go from there.

LearnMate is Australia’s leading tutoring agency offering private lessons in all HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE subjects including English, maths, science, humanities, foreign languages, and so much more. Our mission is simple: to provide professional, engaging and enthusiastic HSC, WACE, VCE & SACE tutors to students, while also ensuring the student feels empowered and confident during their assessments! Ultimately, our goal is to empower students all over Australia to achieve amazing results and make their dreams come true!

CLICK HERE TO SEARCH FOR A TUTOR NOW!
Thermochemical Equations
read more